Archive for the 'Evening Sun Headlines' Category

Columbo was never on Facebook

Friday, January 10th, 2014
Shawn Magrath

Time to make good a new year’s resolution – blog more.

Despite my prolonged hiatus from the blogoshpere, let it be known it wasn’t for lack of trying to post something. Progress. It seems, however, that every time I tried to blog over the last two weeks, something else took priority. Progress. And that something consumed a lot of my time and attention. Progress. And no matter how hard I tried, I couldn’t get away from it. Progress.

For those who can’t quite crack the subliminal code ever so cleverly and discretely woven in, “Progress Chenango” is underway. My own griping aside, the 10-section behemoth that is Progress Chenango serves you – the reader – as an in depth snapshot of various Chenango County businesses, local governments and non profits, the ground they’ve made in the last year and the goals they’ve set for the year to come. From a reporter’s perspective, all those extra stories equate to late nights at the office, living off burnt coffee and whatever we find in the community refrigerator, and trying to make sense of the night time conversations overheard on Lackawanna Ave. (things that can’t be unheard, unfortunately). As our editor put it: wake, write, sleep, repeat. Sound about right.

I feel I wouldn’t be doing justice to my job as a reporter without recapping a tragic series of events that occurred over the last week. On Monday night and Tuesday morning, Mayhood’s Sporting Goods was burglarized not once, but twice. Stolen merchandise included 22 handguns, several long guns and ammunition. On Wednesday, police released the name of Christopher Gonzalez as a suspect wanted for questioning in relation to the burglaries. And for reasons and causes unbeknownst to the public, Gonzalez was found dead on County Road 36 on Friday – the same day police announced they had also arrested Gonzalez’s girlfriend, Brandy Bousson, as an accomplice in the burglaries just two days prior.

All that said, I encourage everyone to let investigators do their job. Of course, nothing can stop the rumor mill once it’s started. But for the sake of the family and respect for the deceased, I say let the issue be until further information is disclosed.

It just occurred to me, Columbo was never on Facebook. “Just one more thing…”

Lastly, I wouldn’t be doing my job as a reporter if I didn’t also bring notice to the heavy traffic at the intersection of South Broad and the Price Chopper Plaza in Norwich. I was stopped at a red light three times before I made it through. I suspect the Norwich mayor has something to do with it. Scandal? Maybe. Minor inconvenience? You know it.

Sports Editor’s Playbook, Jan. 9, 2014

Thursday, January 9th, 2014
Patrick Newell

Basketball Statistics
At the midway point of the season, two basketball teams have the same number of losses with which they started – zero. Norwich is 7-0 and ranked among the top 10 Class B boys teams in New York, while Sherburne-Earlville’s girls improved to 10-0 Thursday night, and recently made an entry into the Class B poll at the 18 spot. Individually, the top three scoring leaders for the boys are David Dufresne of Unadilla Valley at 22.6 points per game; Austin Jasper of S-E, at 19.9 points per tilt; and Zach Wentlent of Greene, who averages an even 19 points per tilt. UV earns a sweep of the scoring leaders with Taylor Davis of the Storm headlining the girls at 17.6 points a game; Lilly Berg of S-E is next at 15.8, and Greene senior Jess David is presently averaging 14.1 points per game.

Rankings
Speaking of the aforementioned rankings, they are available on the New York State Sports Writers Association website, and are updated weekly. Coaches tell me that rankings don’t mean much in the regular season, but they sure do mean a lot to fans – and sportswriters who need something to dress up a game story. In truth, the final poll after the state championships are completed is the only time rankings really matter to coaches.

Don’t stick a fork in me
Earlier this week I officially announced my impending departure from The Evening Sun. Don’t stick a fork in me just yet. I still have hundreds of game reports to bring to the readers, and I hope a deep run in the playoffs will extend my stay. Over the next few weeks, I will share some of my favorites on various local sports topics from the past 19 seasons.

Follow me on Twitter @evesunpat

Sports Editor’s Playbook, 2013 year-end edition

Tuesday, December 31st, 2013
Patrick Newell

Knowing that this is my final winter sports season at The Evening Sun, we’re beginning to wax nostalgic. As 2013 comes to a close, I have reviewed some of the highlights of the previous 12 months of high school sports, and have pinpointed those moments here. We start with the end of the 2012-2013 winter sports season, and bring you through to December 2013. Not every sport is recounted, but that does not diminish the accomplishments of those not mentioned here.

    Winter Sports (January-March)

Wrestling
A half-dozen local wrestlers finished among the top six in the state at the 2013 New York State Division II Wrestling Championships. Norwich’s Frank Garcia and Tristan Rifanburg along with Greene’s Christian Dietrich were one move away from winning state titles, but settled for runner-up finishes. All three are back this year, and are among the favorites in Feb. 2014. Also placing in the state tournament were Greene’s Mike Beckwith, and B-G/Afton’s Mark Viviano and Chris Cirigliano.

Girls’ Basketball
Unadilla Valley finished with its best record in school history (15-2), and captured the Midstate Athletic Conference championship beating Unatego. The Storm, though, ran into formidable opposition in Section IV tournament play facing Harpursville in the opening round. Harpursville survived a last-second UV shot attempt to prevail by two, and went on to win the Section IV crown and advance to the Class C state finals. Although it made an abrupt departure from the postseason, the Storm were among the best Class C teams in the state.

Boys’ Basketball
Norwich overcame a number of injuries and illnesses to claim it second straight Section IV Class B title beating Whitney Point by 22 points. In intersectional play, the Tornado made a strong second-half rally against Westhill only to fall a point short of reaching the state semifinals. Through the first month of the 2013-2014 season, Norwich is again on top of its game entering January 2014 with a perfect 6-0 mark.

Boys’ Swimming
Norwich threatened to win a division title, was third in the Section IV Class B meet, and had a number of top-five individual finishes. The Tornado have continued that momentum to start the 2013-2014 season, and again could challenge for a division championship.

Indoor Track and Field
On the same weekend Norwich’s basketball team was winning a sectional championship, Norwich junior Matt Murray became the best 600-meter sprinter in the state. Murray became the first Norwich athlete to win an indoor track and field state title when he won the 600 meters in early March. If he decides to defend that title this season, he is the odds-on favorite.
 

    Spring Sports (April-June)

Track and Field
The largest accumulation of standout athletic performances this past spring came on the track. Norwich’s Murray and Brooke Bonney won sectional titles, as did B-G/Afton’s Julia Knapp. All three also placed in the Division II state meet. Knapp was fifth in the 100-meter hurdles; Murray took fifth in the 800 meters; and Bonney was fifth in the discus and sixth in the shot put. All three was also champions in their league and class meets. Additionally, Unadilla Valley’s Dylan Thomsen continued to set new records in the distance events, and won a MAC title in the 1,600 meters with a school-record time.

Golf
Norwich repeated as Class B champion taking the team title by a whopping 16 shots. The Tornado linksters were led by overall low medalist, junior Corey Johnson, who shot a 3-over-par 73 at Maple Hill Golf Club.

Softball
G-MU’s girls had the best season amongst the area teams that we cover. The Raiders finished with double-digit wins and won a first-round sectional postseason game before falling to eventual Section IV Class D champion Afton.

Baseball
While no team in Chenango County advanced past the quarterfinal round of the playoffs, we did see one of the most impressive seasons turned in by a Norwich pitcher in some time. Hurling against some of the best hitting teams in New York, junior left-hander Cody Barnes had the highest single-season strikeout total by an NHS pitcher in over 25 years striking out 81 in 40 innings, while also recording all five of Norwich’s victories.

    Fall Sports (August-November)

Football
Sherburne-Earlville claimed a division title in Section III play, earned its highest state ranking, and hosted its first playoff game since joining Section III in 2002. The Marauders finished with a 7-1 record, its best mark in 11-man football in over 40 years. Norwich qualified for the postseason a fifth straight season, but suffered an opening-round playoff defeat to Johnson City

Boys’ Soccer
Greene won yet another MAC league championship, remained unbeaten through the regular season and first two rounds of the postseason before losing in the Class C semifinals – by a single goal – to Marathon.

Girls’ Soccer
Greene senior Paige Wilcox built on her all-time scoring mark finishing with nearly 150 career goals, the highest known total in Chenango County history.

Girls’ Tennis
Norwich coasted to a STAC East division title, and lost just two matches the entire season.

Field Hockey
Greene again advanced to the Section IV finals, but missed intersectional play for the first time since 2005 losing to Whitney Point by a single goal.

Girls’ Swimming
Oxford’s Abby Voce had the top individual performance at the class meets. The eighth-grader was second overall in the 50-yard freestyle.

Follow me on Twitter @evesunpat

Sports Editor’s Playbook, Dec. 17, 2013

Tuesday, December 17th, 2013
Patrick Newell

For the first time in the 30-plus-year history of the Norwich Pennysaver Girls Basketball Tournament, a champion was not crowned. Held last weekend, the longtime event – one that we at The Evening Sun cover extensively – was reduced to three teams when Vestal bowed out of the tournament. Norwich coach Josh Bennett said Vestal officials gave notice in late November. With winter schedules set months in advance, it was impossible to scramble for a fourth team to fill the unexpected vacancy.
As we said, no tournament champion, no all-tournament team, and for first-time tournament entries Utica Proctor and New Hartford, just one game instead of the two that were scheduled. It’s not the first impression you want to make when welcoming newcomers to your tournament, and both schools would be justified in not returning.
The reason for Vestal pulling its girls out of the tournament was a conflict with another school event. Not another sporting event, state testing or even an emergency school assembly. A high school with an enrollment pushing 1,200 kids pulled its 20 to 30 junior varsity and varsity girls out of a two-day event for a school dance.
Yes, you read that right.
“Both Joe (Downey, Norwich athletic coordinator) and I made countless calls and emails (to Vestal) to confirm everything,” Bennett said last weekend.
Bennett was furious with how the tournament played out, but after long discussions with the Utica Proctor and New Hartford coaches, hopes those schools will return to next year’s tournament.
It’s safe to conclude Vestal will not be invited back. One of the core principles of athletics is making a commitment – mind and body – to your team. When you’re school does not honor all of its commitments, what message does that send to the kids?

Follow me on Twitter @evesunpat.

Often, bad news is good news at a masqurade.

Monday, December 16th, 2013
Matt White

Bad news is rampant. It’s everywhere, everyday. From the 24/7 news channels spewing fourth from their prospective social and political soap boxes to the press and mass media, it seems everywhere we look we’re fed nothing but bad news. There’s a reason…It doesn’t keep the lights on.
Due to the fact that the amount of sex in broadcast and print is largely regulated by our ethics, (and by ethics I mean the FCC) horrible news of society’s shortcomings and “poverty porn” are a close second; Those are the stories that pay the bills.
The big box news networks routinely and predictably punctuate the news hour with a “happy” segment, which is just one point of media’s “Keep them Fat, Dumb and Happy” pyramid of success. The upbeat segment is just a little hook to simulate some dopamine and keep you numb.
I’ll agree that it’s tough, often seemingly impossible to find a stitch of legitimate good news. Again, there is a reason. It’s not sexy. It doesn’t sell.
I work in the media, and in doing such I see what lies on both sides of the fence on a weekly basis. Folks will complain about there being no “real” news in the paper, others will laud over the reciprocal negativity printed in cold black Times New Roman.
There’s an interesting balancing act that regularly takes place here in the newsroom. I’m sure plenty of our readers assume that we just print and write whatever the heck we want with no regard to anyone, most likely only where they’re on the short end of the stick.
Likewise, no one seems to have a problem with what we print if it happens to coincide with their beliefs.
The fact of the matter is that we spend a great deal of our time deciding what to write, constantly weighing wither or not a particular subject matter is too liberal, anecdotal or conservative in nature. We argue, yell and disagree; once in a while a door will get slammed shut. The goal is to make the stories that are newsworthy available to the community. Not everyone in the community will ever agree with everything published here.
There is some good news to be found, however. Sometimes a positive story blissfully falls through the cracks. If the story is really good, it will perpetuate and resound through a great many people with the aid of social media. Love it or hate it, the Social media forums of Facebook, Twitter, et al. do sometimes serve a legitimate purpose.
Sometimes, a tragedy occurs, and a community comes together to do whatever they can for a family that is in need or in mourning.
Other times, it’s just a simple status post on Facebook revealing a random act of kindness that were bestowed upon unknowing.
Stories like these are my favorite. They, believe it or not, make me want to do good things and bolster the sentiment of good will.
While we all have our own problems, stresses and anxieties; I still maintain that we can all benefit to a degree by doing something for someone else… even if it’s someone you don’t know. You’ll never see an abundance of these testimonials in the commercialized media, though.
You will likely never hear about the person who payed it forward at the coffee place this morning or read a breaking news article about the teen who ushered an elderly woman across the busy street. You’ll probably never hear about the guy who made shoveling snow a contest amongst his six children in order to motivate them to clear the neighbors walks. And you shouldn’t. This is not news. This is human nature at it’s best.
I’m not so sure I’d want to live in a society where performing random acts of kindness was so significant that we had to print it on the front page of the paper everyday. If doing something that has a beneficial implication for another human were so remarkable that we demand to read it in the headlines, whats the point? Who’s ego are we stroking?
How about we complain less about the lack of good news, and make some good news? Think About it.

Norwich adjusts on the fly

Tuesday, December 10th, 2013
Patrick Newell

Norwich varsity boys’ basketball coach, Tom Collier, said he was in the unfamiliar position of not having a scouting report on Whitney Point. Sure, the Tornado met the Golden Eagles in the Section IV Class B championship game last season, but only two starters from that team returned, and Point had won its first two games this season by an average of 30 points.
In Saturday’s Tom Schwan Tournament opener, Norwich and Whitney Point traded baskets for about a quarter and a half. “It was kind of like two boxers feeling each other out,” Collier said in describing the early play. “We weren’t sure of the type of stuff they would be running, so we made adjustments until we figured it out.”
The tenor of the game changed quickly. Soon after Whitney Point made a tying three to make it 18-18, Norwich shifted to another gear. Over the final half of the second quarter, Norwich scored 16 unanswered points, and rolled into halftime with a 34-18 lead. Storm Cook fueled the Norwich offense early in the game with his aggressive play under the basket, but it was the guards – Mike Sutton, Matt Burke, Chris Trevisani, and Carlos Ithier – who sparked the offensive eruption.
The momentum of the second quarter carried over well into the third quarter. When Mike Oralls made a layup with 2:30 left in their quarter – the final two points of his 20-point evening – Norwich had stretched its lead to 64-26. Doing the math, over a 9 1/2-minute span, the Purple Tornado outscored the Golden Eagles, 44-8. “Let me tell you, Whitney Point is a good team, and they’ll win a lot of games this season,” Collier said. “We started pushing the ball on offense, and they just weren’t able to match up with us.”
Collier said he also made an adjustment in Norwich’s full-court pressure, one that led to numerous Whitney Point turnovers. Those turnovers were converted into easy buckets. “We just throw waves of players at people, and we wear teams into submission,” Collier said. “We had a lot of good players last year, and I think we have even more this year.”
Chenango Forks is next on the docket for Norwich, who play at the Blue Devils tonight.

Clyde Cole Tournament notes
After marking its golden anniversary last season, the Clyde Cole Wrestling Tournament entered the first year of the next 50 this past weekend at Oxford. Before the finals, the Oxford Rotary, sponsors of the tournament, honored former Oxford teacher and coach – and current Section IV sports coordinator – Ben Nelson with its yearly dedication. It was a well deserved honor for Nelson, who has helped promote high school athletics for over 45 years.
One thing to note in the tournament is the official tournament program, one that is extensively detailed with pictures and tournament statistics. Within those statistics is a listing of every person who has won a tournament title since its inception. According to the program, only two athletes have won six Clyde Cole titles, and both wrestled during my tenure at the paper. Oxford’s own, J.P. O’Connor, was a champion from 2000-2005. O’Connor would also win four state titles, and eventually a national collegiate title his senior year at Harvard. Eric Decker of Unatego and later B-G/A also won six Clyde Cole titles. Decker also became the first Section IV wrestler to win six Section IV championships. Decker went on to win three state championships.
I did locate one interesting tidbit. Before Tristan Rifanburg won a state title for Norwich four seasons ago, the most outstanding NHS wrestler I covered was Joe Downey. In his freshman and sophomore years at the CC, Downey ran into a Queensbury wrestler, Dan Stine, who would win one state championship and earn a Division One wrestling scholarship. Downey missed the Clyde Cole tourney his junior year due to injury, but came back his senior year to win his lone Clyde Cole title. That Downey captured just one Clyde Cole tournament speaks to the depth of wrestling talent this yearly event has brought to Chenango County for over half a century.

Follow me on Twitter @evesunpat

If you love me, you’ll send me to rehab…again.

Friday, December 6th, 2013
Matt White

So many topics to blog about this week, so little time. Okay, that last bit was a lie. I have all the time in the world.
Christmas? Doesn’t everyone write about that? Thought so. Forget it.
Drug addicts? Sounds good to me. Here goes.
As a quick disclaimer, I’ll probably part the seas with this one. Inevitably, there’s the possibility that people are going to feel very strongly one way or another about my opinion, which is fine. That’s as it should be as far as I’m concerned. Feel free to fire back with how horrible and insensitive you may think I am based on my opinion. Likewise, feel more than obliged to send me a gold star if the feeling should strike you. I like stickers just as much as the next eight year old.
I guess what peeves me the most about the “addict” label in our society is the way that our government wields the definition around like some sort of justification for criminals. It seems that nowadays, if you just so happen to be under the influence of your drug of choice, the courts pity’s your debilitating circumstance and offers you a road to recovery.
I understand that life is a struggle for some. I’ve been through my fare share of woes, and I know that times are often hard, but hear this: People kick the habit everyday. True Addict’s that want to succeed and have a better life often times do, with no support.
Recently, a well written article went into our paper about shock treatment programs as an alternative to incarceration in New York State. A local Judge said that he was persuaded, in effect, after touring one of the facilities and now will send more convicted “drug offenders” to shock rehabilitation vs. incarceration.
I’m not so convinced. Let’s look at the numbers of repeat offenders. After 36 months post release from Shock, 50% of those who successfully graduated are re-incarcerated whereas 55% of candidates rejected from admission to shock (those who just end up in jail) re-offend and are incarcerated . So is Shock really all that successful at rehabilitating the individual? You go ahead and draw your own conclusions, but I’ll maintain that they do not.
You can find these figures in the Department of Justices’ National Institute of Justice Program focus handbook here: www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles/shockny.pdf, I promise I’m not making this stuff up.
I guess my point is: the system cannot force an individual into rehabilitation, so why do they even try? Criminals have the system down to a science. Addicts are often very intelligent, albeit manipulative, attention-seeking individuals. Sit in on and open-forum Al-Anon meeting and you’ll be sure to find victims who are past enablers of addicts. They can tell you first hand how addicts identify people like themselves, whom they can control and use them to their advantage and personal gain. Sit in on a sentencing or two in county court, read the headlines… “addicts” (hard drug users) are regularly granted second and third chances while people under the influence of alcohol or marijuana are not granted the same “understanding” or variance.
Calling a criminal and addict and forcing them into a rehabilitation program is a thin veil and is in my opinion overused. We are becoming a society of enablers, and it disgusts me.

Fire, festivities, and flying deliveries

Friday, December 6th, 2013
Shawn Magrath

• Last Friday, fire struck The Storage Center in the Town of Norwich, destroying 40 units and wiping out the belongings of hundreds of people. Among the lost items was nearly $8,000 worth of merchandise for the Chenango County Toys for Tots program. Ironically enough, the support given to Toys for Tots since then has put the organization on the fast track to having the best year its ever had. At the risk of sounding like a jerk (and please don’t misconstrue this as not being happy Toys for Tots has pulled through this challenge), maybe that fire is one of the best things that’s ever happened for the local Toys for Tots. It’s funny the way those kinds of things work out.

• Fantastic job to all the kiddos involved in the tree lighting ceremony in the parks in downtown Norwich on Thursday. It baffles me that there are so few events that mix school and community; so whenever the two come together, I’m there. Additional kudos to the volunteers that decorated the park. It’s not quite Rockefeller Center, but it could very well be the next best thing.

• This week, Amazon, the online retail giant, announced hopes of having packages delivered via drone within the next five years. According to the company, a customer could place and order and have it land in their front yard in as few as 30 minutes. For me, it’s concerning as no one knows exactly who will collect customers’ signatures (my solution is to have another drone fly out with a little clipboard, but we’ll see what Amazon comes up with). There are a lot of mixed feelings about use of drones, but if the technology exists, I say why not use it? As I read in one article, having my package shot out of the sky is a whole lot cooler than having it stolen from my front porch.

• The Christmas season is here which means gift shopping, that holly-jolly sense of the seasonal spirit and a barrage of inflatable stuff on peoples’ front yards. All over, homeowners are tapping into their inner Clark Griswold – some hanging enough lights to land a small aircraft. Personally, while I’m not a fan of any decoration that has be deflated when the wind blows too hard, I look forward to lights hanging from rooftops (even though some have been hanging year round and December just means it’s time to plug them in again). It’s the one thing I’ll miss when the holidays have come and gone.

Sports Editor’s Playbook, Dec. 2, 2013

Monday, December 2nd, 2013
Patrick Newell

What a weekend for football – except for my beloved Bills, who bungled a loss out of possible victory.
It was rivalry weekend in college football, and although I prefer the pro game, how could one not appreciate the drama that unfolded? The glitter of my night turned to gold in the “Iron Bowl” as Auburn knocked off number one Alabama in one of the most dramatic endings in recent memory. To sum up:  Alabama missed a long game-winning field attempt that was retrieved nine yards deep in the endzone by the Tigers’ Chris Davis. Davis made a couple of nice moves – certainly nothing Barry Sanders-like – to avoid the lumbering ‘Bama field goal team, and ran 109 yards for the game-winning points. I bear no allegiance to anything in the state of Alabama, but I joined with the millions watching the with a victory lap around my living room. It got better on Sunday because of the local flavor that aired on Time Warner’s local sports station. Over a year ago, my cable package was realigned based on the the digitizing of certain channels. For my purposes, out went the Golf Channel, and in came TWS. The lineup change was well worth it Sunday afternoon as Time Warner aired the New York State football championship games. Chenango Forks beat Rye Neck in the C final, while Maine-Endwell rallied to beat Schalmont in the B title tilt. On their roads to state title games, Forks and M-E beat local teams in lopsided fashion. One of our area coaches was not entirely impressed by the Blue Devils, although he probably could be persuaded to change that opinion now. In an interesting coincidence, the final determining play was a two-point conversion attempt in the final moments. Chenango Forks stopped Rye Neck’s two-point try to take the lead, while Maine-Endwell – after scoring with four seconds left in the fourth quarter – went for two and the win. The Spartans did everything wrong in the first half except for a key defensive stop or two. Even after failing to capitalize on Schalmont’s fumble to start the third quarter, these Spartans showed remarkable resolve.
M-E senior quarterback Kyle Gallagher drove his team 75 yards for a score in less than 90 seconds, the last a four-yard scoring toss to Jake Sinicki. The Spartans sent out kicker Stephen Pham for the tying extra point, but Schalmont called timeout to ice the kicker. In the pro game, I have yet to see a team try to ice the kicker on an extra point, but hey, this is high school football. Giving an extra minute, the M-E coaching staff reconsidered, and came back out with its regular offense. With everything on the line – an unbeaten season, 37 straight wins, and a possible third straight state title -  M-E pulled off the gutsy move when Gallagher found a wide-open Darnell Woolfolk for the two-point toss. I guess Woolfolk was not supposed to run a pass pattern, but after some brief scrambling by Gallagher, drifted to an unattended spot. It was a perfect ending to a third straight perfect season for the Spartans.
If only the Bills could hang on to the ball.
 
Follow me on Twitter @evesunpat

What IS a “good” parent?

Tuesday, November 26th, 2013
Matt White

I read a shared article from the Huffinggton Post recently that made me reflect a bit on the organized madness that has become my life with children.
The gist of the piece touched on that fact that most parents, like myself often feel unworthy of “great parenting” status and oftentimes – through the false guidance of other “perfect” parents – battle the self-criticizing war on being a well balanced parent; with hopes of raising a well balanced child(ren).
The writer, Steve Wiens, explains his biggest pet peeves in simplest form, which I can appreciate: The “Perfects” will say things like “You should enjoy every moment now! They grow up so fast!” False. Sometimes, that just isn’t the case.
What exactly would be the point of “savoring the moment” your prepubescent daughter immobilizes herself in a tantrum because she dislikes the flavor of her toothpaste, all of which you know is just a ploy to extend the pre-bedtime routine? I dare you to explain to me how this moment will be worth thinking back on and reminiscing over in twenty years. Not every single moment of our child’s life was meant to be relished in the first place. Just trust me.
Now, I’m sure many of you will conclude that I am some sort of horrid excuse of a guardian based on that though, and many more will claim to romanticize every waking nanosecond you child spends breathing; but let’s be realistic. You’re not fooling anyone.
Much like Weins, I’d like to take these folks (The “Perfects”, NOT the children) and hold them under water… just for a minute; just until they start to panic a little bit. Maybe then the “Perfects”will understand the gravity of having 7 arguing children under one roof at once. Maybe then they’ll understand why the first 3 minutes of dinner – when they’re all stuffing their little faces – is my favorite part of the day; maybe then, they’ll know or remember what it feels like to not be able to “take it anymore.”
Don’t get me wrong. I am not complaining, friends. It’s a very rare occasion when we’re all actually at the table at once. The majority of the time the size of the table seems exaggerated. I have two ex-spouses and we share our children, which is still a relatively new concept for me. Usually about five minutes after my children return to the care of their mother; the silence sets in and I can tell you with all certainty that I’d rather have them there arguing with me about how much they “don’t like corn” or talking back like a Disney diva than not at all.
Everyone’s heard the adage “with age comes wisdom,” or the like. I am slowly learning how to let things that I used to be so adamant about slide for the sake of my children’s autonomy, and for the sake of peace. I’ve come to understand that each of them need to be dealt individually and not as an army brigade. The dialogue in our house is ever changing and I swear I’m doing my best. I DO cherish most of the precious little time I spend with my kids out of default, so please don’t try and drive the point home by cramming it down my throat. Not every second of parenthood was meant to be framed on a wall.