Archive for the 'Evening Sun Headlines' Category

Updates from the newsroom

Tuesday, March 3rd, 2015
Ashley Babbitt

It has been far too long since the last ‘newsroom update,’ so here we go.

• Since my last blog, The Evening Sun staff has moved locations, and we’re now finally settled it. Well, my walls could use some art — and I have a few local artists in mind — but all in good time. For now I like my coffee cups and notebooks. The decorating can wait.
• As you may have noticed in last Friday’s print edition, ‘Thumbs’ returned to the Viewpoints page of the paper. Each week, the writers and I will weigh in on an issue and give a brief opinion. Sometimes a thumb will be in regard to a village, town or city meeting, a new piece of legislation, a new business opening, a kind act witnessed (or personally carried out), or something in relation to our local criminal justice system. ‘Thumbs’ give each writer an opportunity to voice how they felt about something they may have covered, whereas in their news story, they remain objective.
• Something else that will be rolling out soon is a newly designed online ’30 Seconds’ submission page. All will be given the opportunity to create a handle before they submit their thoughts or reactions. The reason behind this new feature is because ’30 Seconds’ will be returning to print in the near future. The handle will allow me to pick the best (and worst) posts to put into print twice per week, and will ensure that one person isn’t pretending to post as another. There still will be the opportunity to post as man or woman from wherever you may be.
• Also related to ’30 Seconds,’ in no way do I find joy in censoring the words of others, but I would be willing to bet that people who submit the extremely profane, derogatory, racist, and downright mean posts know before they hit ‘submit’ that I won’t approve it. We could save us both some time if we cut out the hardcore swear words I see on a daily basis.
• It was great to see the photographs our photographer Frank Speziale shot from the Holy Family Lenten Fish Fry on Friday. The happiness in each of the photos Frank brought me put a smile on my face, and showed me that the people who help out at the weekly event really do care. It was very nice to see.
• Congratulations to the two young men who won the State Championship with their wrestling skills. Even though I am not as familiar with their career as our Sports Editor Pat Newell is, I have paid attention to their sports activities for the past couple years, and it’s been exciting. Well done, Mr. Rifanburg and Mr. Garcia.
• There have been numerous complaints about the winter weather we’ve been having. I allow myself one complaint per season. I use my winter and summer complaints right away. The first time I have to clean the snow off my car, I use my winter complaint. Once the temperature goes above 70 degrees, there goes my summer complaint. But I digress, even though it’s March, it’s still winter and chances are it will snow. Use caution when driving, don’t drive unless it’s necessary, keep warm, make sure your pets are inside, and remember it’ll be over soon. I have a hard time complaining when I have a roof over my head and there are plenty of people in this world without that.
• Things are rolling along in the newsroom, with some investigative, in-depth stories on tap. These include research that has taken weeks so far, and the filing for certain documents necessary for the stories to come to life. They’re not time sensitive, but I think readers will find them interesting and perhaps eye-opening.
• In closing, we are working on a year-long series that will highlight those who hail from Chenango County who have made a name for themselves. This includes humanitarians, arts and entertainment, science and medicine, business, politics … you name it. We plan to feature a different individual each week once we have our ideas solidified. We’re opting to include those who are living that are currently making an impact — be in here in Chenango or anywhere else in the world — or who have left a lasting impact but are no longer with us. If you have a nomination for someone who fits this criteria, please send an email to ababbitt@evesun.com or send a private message to The Evening Sun’s Facebook page.

Two area coaches retiring

Friday, February 27th, 2015
Patrick Newell

RETIREMENTS

I remember my first interaction with Paul DuVall. It was around 1996 or 1997 and DuVall was running the Unadilla Valley peewee wrestling program. He submitted a photo and caption information for publication in our sister paper, The Gazette. A few days after publishing the story, Paul gave me a call. He wasn’t happy with the “creative license” I took with the write-up. After a short conversation, I think I appeased Paul, and encouraged him to keep submitting information about his young wrestlers.
Perhaps it was the following year, Paul took over as head coach of the UV wrestling program. At the time, there were just a few kids on the team, and Jeremy Wetherbee was the lone standout. Wetherbee would advance to the sectional finals multiple times under DuVall’s tutelage. Although Wetherbee did not win a section title, he was the foundation of a wrestling program that grew and improved year after year. I took an inventory each season at the sectional wrestling tournament: Every year, Unadilla Valley had an increasing number of sectional tournament qualifiers, and the program reached its peak when Trevor Franklin won a state title. DuVall resurrected the Unadilla Valley wrestling program that remains solid to this day. A few years after Franklin’s state title, DuVall and his family moved into the Sherburne-Earlville school district – his alma mater – and soon, DuVall was assisting on the coaching staff under head coach Bim Palmer. Palmer has been an old friend of DuVall’s since the two wrestled together for S-E in the pee wee ranks. Palmer said earlier this week that DuVall would be retiring from coaching at the completion of his son’s high school wrestling career. I tip my cap to a dedicated man who has coached dozens and dozens of kids for nearly two decades, and has done it most of the time on a volunteer basis. Palmer said he’s keeping DuVall’s locker in the coaches’ room at the ready. You know, just in case DuVall gets the bug to coach again.

If ever there was a person who has defied time, it’s Bainbridge-Guilford’s Tim Mattingly. He’s one of those ageless wonders now in his mid-50s, and he looks almost exactly the same as when I met him 20 years ago. Mattingly, who has taught and coached at his alma mater for well over 30 years, will retire at the end of the school year.
I came to know Tim my first year on the job as the right-hand man to B-G girls varsity basketball coach Bob Conway. Conway has coached the Bobcats for 22 years, and Mattingly has been his junior varsity and assistant varsity coach every step of the way. Mattingly was also a junior varsity football coach, assistant varsity coach, and the past nine years, the varsity football coach at B-G. In recent years, Mattingly has led the varsity baseball program, and this spring will be his last as a varsity coach.
Tim has been friendly and accommodating from the day I met him, and I was happy to cover the athletic accomplishments of his two daughters Courtney and Ashley – the former perhaps the best local girls’ basketball player I have ever covered. Conway will certainly miss Mattingly’s presence on the bench. “He’s really been a co-coach,” Conway said. “We have the same mentality for the game and our expectations for the kids are the same.
“He’s just a great person, great with kids, and academically, he does a good job of teaching. He’s leaving a big hole to fill.”
Best wishes to Mattingly in retirement.

Follow me on Twitter @PatrickLNewell

Sports Editor’s Playbook, Feb. 19, 2015

Thursday, February 19th, 2015
Patrick Newell

As much as I would like, I can’t fit every good comment from a coach into a game story. Some coaches waver a little off topic or linger on individual play – or players – that digress too far from a game story. I often hoard these words of wisdom as potential blog material, and I’ve dubbed this fodder “quotable leftovers.”
Following Norwich’s thrilling 44-43 win over Horseheads Wednesday night, head coach Tom Collier, understandably, had a lot to say. (Actually, he always has a lot to say.)
It’s enjoyable to hear Tom regal the play of each guy who contributed to a win, and no player’s contribution is overlooked. Tom preaches a team approach to offense and defense, and in his four years as head coach, no player on his team has averaged better than 14.2 points a game. This season, the state-ranked Tornado do not have a player averaging more than 12 points a game.
Yet, Norwich has consistently remained one of the area’s highest scoring teams. Wednesday night, Collier devoted a lot of time to the efforts of sophomore Tre Bonham and senior Chris Trevisani. If you watched the second half, you saw Bonham bury the game-winning points; however, Trevisani didn’t budge from his seat on the bench except to cheer his teammates on or stand for a timeout.
In the first half, Trevisani did see a few key minutes, this after taking a DNP (did not play) in last Thursday’s loss to Oneonta.
Trevisani was summoned by the Tornado staff in the second quarter when the offense was languishing. Trevisani is a deadly outside shooter, and he ignited the crowd in his two- or three-minute stint. He had an open three that was just off the mark, but on his second shot attempt in he right corner, he swished a jump shot that gave Norwich late first-half momentum.
“The reality is that everyone wants to be a hero, but Chris is a role player for us, and he played that to perfection,” Collier said. “That was a big shot for us because it energized our bench. Chris’ number was called, and he delivered for us. He’s a great team player who is beloved by his teammates. Chris epitomizes what we are as a team.”
As for Bonham, the grind of 5:30 a.m. workouts and making 300 jump shots before school each day paid off. “Tre Bonham made the shot of the game for us,” Collier said. “You know what, there were some people who didn’t think he deserved to be with us (on the varsity). Nobody deserved that shot more than Tre. He’s a dedicated player, and he does what it takes to be a winner.”

Other Collier musings:

* “At one point in the game, we had all sophomores and juniors on the floor (against Horseheads), and they had all seniors on the floor. Our juniors scrapped and got us back in the game.”
* “We gave a speech at halftime about getting bullied in the first half (by Horseheads). What’s the best thing to do against a bully? Bully them back, and we did that in the second half.”
* “After losing to Oneonta last week, there was doubt in my mind whether this team was mentally and physically tough enough. We weren’t sure (as a coaching staff). We challenged the guys all week in practice, and they responded. It was a test of our character, and I couldn’t be more proud of our players.”

Follow me on Twitter @PatrickLNewell

Curtis raised the bar

Tuesday, February 10th, 2015
Patrick Newell

The first time I saw John Curtis, I didn’t know his name, but I thought, at the time, he bore a resemblance to one-time PGA Tour member Tom Weiskopf. Curtis was playing in his regular foursome at Canasawacta Country Club with Dave Clarke, Russ Lowe, and Joe Brillinger. Curtis didn’t hit it like Weiskopf, but he was a pretty good stick.
I came to know Curtis in my early years working at the newspaper as he succeeded Tony Abbott as varsity football coach. Abbott had a Hall of Fame career lifting Oxford to the top of the Susquenango Association several times. Curtis, an assistant under Abbott, served as the offensive coordinator for Abbott, and Curtis put his own stamp on the program when he took the reins in 1996.
“John was a little different than me,” Abbott said in a phone interview Monday. “I was a big option guy. Being a former high school quarterback, John liked to throw it more, and he did. That was probably our only difference.”
There was no difference with the results on the field, either. Abbott won 147 games during his 27 seasons, and Curtis tacked on 72 more victories during his tenure to give Oxford 219 football wins from 1970 to 2006. Looking over our records, that is the most wins for a Chenango County football team during that span.
Said Mike Chrystie, who played on three Section IV championship teams under Curtis, and is now head coach at Norwich: “John was definitely a model of consistency that I am striving for as a football coach, and I hope, one day, our program can reach the consistency he had at Oxford.”
When you’re in this business and building relationships within the many small communities, there aren’t many degrees of separation. My “Oracle of Bacon” number with John Curtis was one, and I didn’t even know it the first year I covered his teams.
As I got to know John a little better, I learned more about his family. His wife, Jean, was an elementary school teacher. At some point, I am sure I asked John if his wife ever taught school at St. Paul’s (now named Holy Family). John said she did at the start of her teaching career.
I remembered that my second grade teacher at St. Paul’s was Mrs. (Jean) Curtis, and my mom confirmed the football coach’s wife was an integral part of my childhood education.
I was on friendly terms with John throughout the 11 years we worked together, but I’ve learned more about him in the two days since his passing than I ever did during our professional relationship.
Don Cooper coached along side Curtis for 31 years, and was Curtis’ right-hand man as the defensive coordinator on the 1997, 1999, and 2000 Section IV Class D championship teams.
Cooper worked with a lot of great coaches on the Oxford staff, coached against some of the finest field generals in Section IV, and knew of perhaps every other good coach in Central New York. He pinpointed one characteristic about Curtis that made him unique.
As every coach knows, from time to time you deal with undisciplined and disrespectful athletes, and its well known that many parents can be just as unruly in their treatment of a coach.
“What made John stand out in my mind, and I wrote this in the dedication of the scoreboard (to John), is that he was the most professional guy,” Cooper said. “I spent thousands of hours with him, and never once did he bad-mouth a kid or a parent.”
Cooper said that one time a parent blew cigar smoke in Curtis’ face in an effort to provoke the head coach. Curtis was a robust, athletic man in his prime, and surely could have handled himself in any altercation. However, Curtis diffused the situation by remaining calm and professional.
While Maine-Endwell and Chenango Forks have set the bar in Section IV with their multiple sectional football championships and ensuing state titles, Curtis set the bar high in Chenango County with seven sectional title game appearances and three Section IV titles in four years.
Curtis raised the bar around these parts, and no has come close to reaching it.

Follow me on Twitter @PatrickLNewell

Garcia, Rifanburg in twilight of their great careers

Monday, February 2nd, 2015
Patrick Newell

Wednesday, Jan. 28, I reported from Norwich High School. It was a significant day, at least if you’re a wrestling fan as defending state champions Tristan Rifanburg and Frank Garcia were among the four seniors honored before the team’s final home match. (Trey Muserallo and Stephen Kuhn were also recognized with their families.) Every school in every sport that I cover reserves a night near the end of the season to pause and appreciate the outgoing senior class. I miss the majority of those occasions, but I wanted to be on hand for this one if only to be on site for the final home appearance of what is likely the best one-two punch Norwich wrestling has had.
The Purple Tornado have a long and distinguished wrestling history, and one of the first great NHS wrestlers, Don Manley, is part of the 2015 Norwich High School Sports Hall of Fame induction class. I don’t have Manley’s biography, but I believe he lost just one match his entire wrestling career.
Rifanburg and Garcia have each lost more than once, but neither one ever lost on the home mat. In fact, Rifanburg never lost a match in a dual meet with all of his defeats coming in tournament competition. I don’t have the same verifiable documentation for Garcia, but I wouldn’t be surprised if he was undefeated in dual meets. That’s six straight years, folks.
Norwich coach Terry Hagenbuch said it was nice to know that he had those two wrestlers in his pocket for dual meets. With perhaps a scant few exceptions, the phenomenal wrestling duo has wrestled in back-to-back matches in dual meets – one weight class apart – and quite often, in tournament finals. Each young man is in the twilight of his high school wrestling career, but the good news is that they aren’t going far, and they will be easy to track.
Rifanburg and Garcia each received wrestling scholarships to Binghamton University, and I’m sure each will write more exciting chapters to their athletics stories.
Note: I wrote the above piece on Friday, Jan. 30. Rifanburg and Garcia helped lead Norwich to its first STAC team title in 24 years. Rifanburg was also named the most outstanding wrestler after winning his fifth league championship. One more line added to the duo’s long wrestling resume.

Follow me on Twitter @PatrickLNewell

Sports Editor’s playbook, Jan. 8, 2015

Thursday, January 8th, 2015
Patrick Newell

Athlete of the Week
Friday, we re-install our Athlete of the Week series for the remainder of the winter sports season. The criteria in selecting an athlete is based on either the prior week’s performance or an accumulation of performances throughout the season. While we take nominations from coaches, the decision is usually a subjective one from yours truly. Hope you enjoy the feature the next seven weeks.

Jones legacy
Jack Jones first gained prominence around the Southern Tier as a state championship-winning basketball coach at Sidney who amassed an incredible winning percentage. He went on to a distinguished career in athletics administration finishing up his tenure at Norwich High School.
ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease) claimed the life of the Hall of Fame coach and administrator, but his legacy continues on the basketball court. Jones’ grandsons, Sean and Ryan Jones, are key members of this year’s Bainbridge-Guilford varsity basketball team. Earlier this week, Sean Jones had one of his best performances of the season scoring eight points and pulling down 10 rebounds against Sidney. Ryan Jones is among the team’s leading scorers averaging 10.6 points per game for the Bobcats. Ryan Jones also scored a season-high 22 points in a win over Afton last month, and has two other 15-point games this year.

Norwich grad gets new coaching appointment
Joe Casamento, a 1965 Norwich High School graduate, recently accepted a position associate head football coach at St. John’s College High School, a prestigious private school in Washington D.C. Casamento has coached Syracuse Christian Brothers Academy the past 17 seasons compiling a 143-27 mark including a Class AA state championship win in 2004. Casamento was on the sidelines in 1999 when the Brothers beat Casamento’s alma mater, 55-20, in the Class B regional finals, the last time Norwich qualified for the state playoffs.

Follow me on Twitter @PatrickLNewell

A place in the Sun.

Thursday, January 8th, 2015
Matt White

It’s been a ridiculously cold week here in Chenango County to say the least. Despite windchills hovering on the negative side of the mercury, things have been steadily heating up in terms of deadline pressure for all of us here at the Evening Sun as we place finishing touches on 2015′s Progress Chenango edition—due to hit shelves in just a few short weeks.
As a part of that extra workload, I toured the Raymond facility in Greene for the first time ever on Wednesday. What an experience.
As if the sheer size plant wasn’t deceiving from the glimpse you catch of it on route 12 at 55 mph, the level of morale, integrity and quality was equally fascinating.
I’ve worked in several fabrication shops, factories, ect. over the years— let me tell you—those were all small-time compared to what Raymond has going on. Moreover, each of the 1,600-plus employees that work there all seem to be happy and proud to be a part of the Raymond family.
And why wouldn’t they?
I’m willing to bet that there are very few local companies—small or large—that have made as deep of an impact on their particular industry as Raymond has had in the field of material handling. Raymond invented, patented and made the pallet an industry standard three years after the invention of the first pallet jack… all right here in Chenango County, NY… in the tiny Village of Greene.
Consider this. Every single item you have touched today has traveled through a chain of distribution that is based upon pallets invented in Greene. Those simple wooden pallets are basically the DNA of commerce. Tractor trailers that you see driving down the road were designed around the pallet. 100 percent of anything you can buy off a shelf in a store came in through the receiving door on a pallet —more often than not— moved out of a trailer by a Raymond fork truck designed, manufactured and assembled from the ground-up in Chenango County.

The pride runs deep there, and that’s something I can definitely  get behind.
Needless to say, I’m excited to write at least one of my Progress stories.
Also of notable mention this week, I received confirmation earlier today that  the Chenango United Way has reached their $421,000 goal. What an amazing feat!.
For a bit there it seemed as if the organization would only top 85 percent of that goal, but with a healthy combination of tenacity on the parts of Victoria Mitchell and Elizabeth Monaco, and the generous giving spirit of Chenango county citizenry — it all worked out in the end. Great job ladies!
With that, I need to get to work.

Here’s to a great 2015, folks!

Seth Rogen’s new claim to fame

Friday, December 19th, 2014
Shawn Magrath

It blows my mind that a movie that sets unprecedented threats of terrorism in the U.S. also stars Seth Rogen.

Of course I’m talking about the recent decision made by Sony Pictures to scrap “The Interview,” a movie about two idiots hired to assassinate North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un (who’s just a teddy bear of a man, according to Dennis Rodman. With Rodman’s trustworthy face and reputable history of well balanced behavior, I can’t think of reason not to believe him).

The film that was originally scheduled to be released in theaters on Christmas Day will instead set on the storage shelves of Sony Pictures indefinitely due to terrorist threats. Sony received messages from cyber hackers this week stating there would be 9/11 style repercussions if the film ever made it to projectors. On Thursday, federal investigators released information suggesting that hackers left behind digital fingerprints which could connect the hack to North Korea. Surprising, I know.

Since pulling the movie, Sony has received a backlash of criticism for giving in to terrorist threats. Even President Obama weighed in Friday, saying Sony “made a mistake” by pulling the movie, which I wholeheartedly agree. But the debate over freedom of speech and giving into the demands of terrorists aside, lets’ focus a moment on what I think is a bigger issue… the movie starred Seth Rogen. The same Seth Rogen who had leading roles in noncontroversial films like “Pineapple Express,” the non-Academy Award winning “This is the End,” and the heartfelt and delightfully charming “Knocked Up.”

In some way, I think part of me always knew that guy would be the one responsible the next potential American tragedy.

Sports Editor’s Playbook, Dec. 8, 2014

Monday, December 8th, 2014
Patrick Newell

Sports stories can come at any place, any time. This one isn’t so much a story, but a welcomed experience. Since I was a little kid, I followed boxing closely. Remember the days when boxing’s biggest stars appeared on “cable television?” I do, although it was so long ago, this generation completely missed out on that free experience. This past Saturday night, I traveled down to Oxford to cover the Clyde Cole Wrestling Tournament finals. The schedule said the tournament dedication was slated at 5 p.m., with introductions and matches to follow. Let’s just say, the schedule was off a good 90 minutes or so, but that extra time allowed me to mix with some old friends…and meet one of boxing’s greats from the 1990s.
About 10 minutes after I arrived, Sun staff photographer, Frank Speziale, found me sitting near the head table, and he was smiling ear to ear. He told about a picture he had just taken of Ray “Merciless” Mercer. I thought to myself, you mean “Merciless” Ray Mercer. I didn’t correct Frank, he was beyond excited.
First question I ask Frank: “Why is Ray Mercer in Oxford?” Frank didn’t have all of the details, but he hurried back to his contact person to grab more information. I learned that Mercer was working with Eddy Pezzino (a Greene High grad and former athlete). Pezzino owns American Sports Equity, and part of the company’s message is to deliver the anti-bullying message to schools in the Southern Tier. Oxford was the latest stop, and Mercer was the special guest helping deliver that message.
Pezzino, who was well aware of the Clyde Cole tourney as a former wrestler, had Mercer stay on until Saturday, and Mercer helped present medals to the weight class winners. Mercer was seated matside, and I took the seat right next to him prior to the opening bout. I got to chat with Mercer for a good 30 minutes (during breaks in the wrestling action), and was able to pick his brain a little bit. Mercer is an avid outdoorsman, and particularly enjoys fishing. I talked up the great outdoors opportunities in Chenango County, so maybe we’ll see Mercer back here some day. Mercer hails from Jacksonville, Fla., although I’m not sure he lives there now. He remarked about the quiet, safe atmosphere during his stay in Oxford. “I’ve been here a day and a half, and I haven’t heard a siren,” he said. If I had the right platform, I would have asked him all about his career, one that took off after he won the heavyweight gold medal at the 1988 Olympics in Seoul, Korea. Mercer was already in his late 20s when he won the gold medal, so his window was fairly short. He captured a world title in 1991, and during that era, fought nearly all of the great heavyweights during that era including Larry Holmes, Tommy Morrison, Michael Moorer, Evander Holyfield, and many others. Turns out, his career as a fighter lasted until he was 48 years old when he took an MMA fight against former UFC heavyweight champion, Tim Sylvia in 200.
Mercer gave away seven inches in height and about 50 pounds, but recorded one of the fastest knockouts ever recorded – a one-punch knockout in nine seconds. That was a great way to end a career, and Mercer agreed. “I knew if I caught him on the chin, I would knock him out,” Mercer said. Mercer’s obligations ended after he handed out the first series of awards up to the 125-pound weight class before slipping out for the evening. I didn’t get a chance to say goodbye, but I was certainly pleased to share some time with a boxing legend.

Follow me on Twitter @PatrickLNewell

A time to give back to those who give back

Wednesday, November 26th, 2014
Ashley Babbitt

With Thanksgiving tomorrow, I found it appropriate to write my blog about an event tonight that is to help benefit a Norwich native who has been providing aid to Jamaican children for years.
Thanksgiving eve is known to be one of — if not the biggest — bar night of the year. Many folks have traveled home for the holiday and go out to see friends they haven’t seen in perhaps years.
This year, Norwich band Seek the Lion is playing at Rita’s Tavern in Norwich and is passing a hat around the establishment for those individuals who are feeling the mood to give to a cause; the endeavors of Jeffrey Neadom.
Neadom travels to Jamaica to aid children in need.
Neadom said, “The seed for helping out Jamaica was planted in 1993 when I camped there for 3 weeks. “In 2012 on my birthday eve I started the Jamaican Schools Project on Facebook in memory of my mom.”
Neadom added that he teamed up with the president of the PTA at Craighton Primary School and raised funds to renovate the boys and girls bathrooms.
Last year, Neadom returned to Jamaica and renovated the nurse’s office and sick bay, supplied them with beds, mattresses, bedding and medicine, and painted the canteen and principals office. He additionally tiled and pained in the nurse’s office and the sick bay.
Neadom plans to head out to Jamaica again, and there are funds necessary in order to complete the projects to help out the children in need.
“This year I’m hoping to resurface the playground and do a small library/reading room,” said Neadom.
Seek the Lion’s guitarist Nate Collins said, “With all the terrible things happening in the country and world right now, we’re just glad that we can help Jeff make a positive difference in people’s lives.”
Drummer Nick Andrews said anything that individuals are willing or able to spare to help Neadom out is greatly appreciated.
“We have known (Neadom) for years and for years he has helped to rebuild schools in Jamaica,” said Andrews. “Tonight we are passing a hat to raise money for his next trip. Hopefully with what we raise he can at least get the kids some more things they need.”
Neadom said, “Now I’m just trying to give them (the children) a safe place for recess. There are 125 students so it’s cramped, but the resurfacing will give them a lot more room.”
A woman who donated money to Neadom’s fund, Sandy Myers, said, “After my recent trip to Jamaica, I can completely appreciate the work (Neadom is) doing. Keep it up Jeff, you’re doing a good thing.”
As a group, Seek the Lion shared its goal. Any money raised to send out with Neadom will help guarantee a safe and healthy schoolhouse for less fortunate children. The group said they want the youth to succeed and one of the best ways to do that is give them the opportunity to do so.
“Thanks everyone it means a lot to us and the kids,” said Andrews.
Seek the Lion describes its sound as “reggae dance music.” The show at Rita’s Tavern begins at 9 p.m.
Local musician Ben Miner is set to open for the band beginning at 8:30 p.m.
“I’ve got a few donations so far, and several people have committed to giving, so I’m feeling good,” said Neadom. “Family helps.”
Those unable to make the show due to the snow, or due to being out of the area, but who still would like to donate to the cause can visit Neadom’s GoFundMe page at gofundme.com/jamaicanschools.