kevin's Reporter Blog

History or entertainment?

Tuesday, October 16th, 2012
Kevin Doonan

For decades World War II has captured the imagination of thousands of people. Few events have ever inspired as many movies and books and it is understandable because there really are no other periods of history that have matched the 1940s in sheer scope. World War II was the largest global conflict the world has ever seen and it is still hard to fathom.

The Holocaust has also often been explored, both as a part of World War II and as a subject all to itself. Yet ironically it has in many more ways than World War II remained largely enigmatic subject. Famous movies such as Spielberg’s “Schindler’s List” meshed the firsthand accounts into a deceptive narrative that misleads audiences into the belief that one of the most complicated and difficult to understand events in all of humanity’s history can be so relayed so easily. I watched “Schindler’s List” for the first time during a film course. The professor reminded the class more than once that we were watching a work of fiction masquerading as a historical document. I found this particularly irritating especially since I was just fresh out of a Holocaust class. I appreciated Spielberg’s use of details from famous Holocaust accounts to create the semblance of reality. Nonetheless, it had never occurred to me to take a movie from the man who brought us “Jaws” and “E.T.” as anything more than an entertaining blockbuster that is in no way a historical document.

One of the reasons the memory of the Holocaust has remained prevalent, despite the fact that many veterans and Holocaust survivers are passing away, is because it is an episode in human history that still leaves even the most hardened of historians perplexed and unsettled. Millions of average individuals actively participated in the extermination of people who at times they had known all of their lives. It is unsettling indeed to dispassionately compare today’s U.S. to the Weimar Republic. I found that the more I learned about the Holocaust, the more I felt that only a thin line separates civilized society from acts of organized and publically sanctioned barbarity.

In the shadow of the Crusades …

Monday, October 15th, 2012
Kevin Doonan

As an undergraduate studying history, I took a wide variety of classes but there were a few that really stuck with me.

One especially challenging class I took was class on the Crusades. The course material covered a large swath of time that greatly shaped the world. I was surprised to found out just how relevant a series of events that took place almost a millenium ago still is today; one example being the controversy sparked by President Bush’s use of the word “crusade” during his September 16, 2001 address to the nation.

Another intriguing connection between the modern world and the Crusades occurred in 2010, during the time I was enrolled in the course. A package containing a bomb was sent from Yemen to Chicago, addressed to Reynald Krak, another name for Reynald of Châtillon. Reynald was a brutal knight who rose to eminence in the Crusader states during the latter half of the 1100s. After arriving the Middle East during the second Crusade in 1147, Reynald remained in the Middle East. Over the course of the next 40 years, Reynald made a name for himself as an opportunist, willing to attack anyone regardless of religion or any existing armistice. By 1186, Reynald had become the lord of Krak des Chevaliers, one of the most famous and impressive castles in history still standing located within the borders of modern day Syria.

Reynald is most famous though for his role in instigating the Battle of Hattin in 1187 between the crusader states and the forces of Saladin. Despite an existing armistice between the king of Jerusalem, Reynald’s liege, and Saladin, the founder of the Ayyubid dynasty, Reynald began plundering Muslim caravans traveling near the Krak des Chevaliers. Reynald’s blatant infractions of the armistice resulted in the Battle of Hattin and the monumental defeat of one of the largest Crusader armies ever assembled. Both Reynald and Guy of Lusignan, the Christian king of Jerusalem, were captured along with a great number of the Knights Templar. Reynald was beheaded by Saladin personally and all of the Knights Templar were executed as well. The Battle of Hattin left the Crusader states in such a weakened state, Saladin was able to capture the city of Jerusalem with relative ease. In the end if it wasn’t Reynald of Châtillon, the primary language spoken in Jerusalem today may well have been French (though even if the Battle of Hattin had never happened, that still would have been a long shot).

The Anti-Masonic Telegraph

Friday, October 12th, 2012
Kevin Doonan

Seeing as how this is National Newspaper Week, I thought it would be interesting to delve into the obscure and murky deluge of our own early beginnings here at The Evening Sun and dredge up something cool. Having come across conflicting accounts, I have been unable to determine at present whether The Evening Sun (then The Morning Sun) came out of the Chenango Telegraph in 1891, or if the founder Reed Campbell had simply bought the Telegraph earlier that year. Either way, the history of The Evening Sun is tied to the legacy it inherited from the Chenango Telegraph.

Just like The Evening Sun, the Chenango Telegraph changed names more than once over the course of its history. J. F. Hubbard printed the first edition of the edition of the Chenango Telegraph on Nov. 14, 1816, under the name The Norwich Journal. The name was changed in 1829 by a new owner, E.P. Pellet. Pellet chose for his weekly publication a strangely explicit and finite title. When Pellet picked up the first copy of his paper still laden with wet ink, he read aloud to his constituents the words “The Anti-Masonic Telegraph.” Of course I am taking liberties in imagining that he did so; he may very well have not even glanced at the first edition, but he did purposefully call his paper The Anti-Masonic Telegraph and ran it as so for six years. The weekly ran under the name for about six years before the name was changed again to the Chenango Telegraph.

Why create a paper solely for the purpose of creating an ardent philippic targeting the secret society? Well, you see Anti-Masonic sentiment was running rampant throughout the northeast during the early half of the 1800s following the tale of a bizarre incident in upstate New York called the “Morgan Affair.”

William Morgan was a stonemason who joined a fledgling Mason lodge, learning some secrets about the Masons. During the year of 1826, in an attempt to further his social standing, Morgan tried to join a more prestigious Mason Lodge, the Royal Arch Chapter in Batavia, NY. He was refused, supposedly on the basis that he was an unemployed drunkard. In an act of vengeance, he published some of the Mason’s secrets learned as member of a minor Mason Lodge. He was arrested afterwards for a debt of less than three dollars, supposedly at the bequest of the Masons. He was either moved or kidnapped and brought to a U.S. fort near Niagara Falls. It has been said that he was never seen again, but in truth his fate probably only really mattered to Morgan himself. Following his imprisonment and disappearance, people dove on the story and claimed that the Masons had drowned poor Morgan for revealing their secrets. Though the story was disproved, reporter Thurlow Weed claimed that a body washed up on the shore of Lake Ontario was Morgan’s. Thurlow was able to rally anti-Masonic sentiment which spread first through New York, including Norwich, and then through the rest of the nation. The anti-Masonic movement eventually grew into the nation’s first third political party.

The Norwich Publishing Company

Thursday, October 11th, 2012
Kevin Doonan

The following is an article published in The Norwich Sun in 1952, celebrating the commencement of the paper’s 62nd year of service to the community. The article briefly describes the newspaper’s beginnings and then focuses the majority of its attention on the inner workings of the publication.

NORWICH INDUSTRY ON PARADE

by TONY VELLA

As reported by The Norwich Sun on March 17, 1952

The Norwich Publishing Co.

The Norwich Sun today begins its sixty-second year of publication. Actually, yesterday marked the 61st anniversary of Chenango county’s only daily newspaper, for it was on March 16, 1891 that The Morning Sun first appeared in the homes of Norwich.

The job of placing a Newspaper in practically all of the homes in the city places The Norwich Publishing company with other top industries in Norwich. While other industries produce durable goods, the publishing company “manufactures” a newspaper for daily consumption.

The predecessor of The Norwich Sun had its beginnings in the days when Norwich had not yet gained its foothold as a thriving manufacturing community. Only five years had passed since The Norwich Pharmacal company was brought to the city by a retired minister when the first issue of The Morning Sun was being read.

On March 7, 1904, The Morning Sun made its first appearance as the new Norwich Sun. On that day, a copy of the “Sun” was placed in every house in Norwich, Greene, Oxford, Smyrna, and Sherburne. Whereas The Morning Sun was published on Mechanic Street, The Norwich Sun was published, as it is now, on Lackawanna Avenue.

Six years after the county’s only daily became an afternoon paper, the late P.L. Clark took over the job of editor-in-chief. He was to remain with the paper for almost 40 years. During many of those years he served as secretary of the company in addition to editor-in-chief. With his passing in February of 1950, Norwich lost one of its leading citizens as well as a first-rate newspaperman.

Another top newspaperman and civic-minded citizen was Perry Browne, who to many people was The Norwich Sun. He joined the editorial staff of the Sun in 1921, and through the years served as sports editor, advertising manager, city editor, and finally editor and general manager. With his passing in March of 1951, Norwich again lost one of its beloved citizens as well as a top journalist.

Both men were largely responsible for the successful rise of The Norwich Sun. Both knew the characteristics of a small town daily, and both had the best interests of Norwich in mind whenever they sat down at a typewriter.

The Norwich Sun today is of course a far cry from the daily of 61 years ago. Still a firm believer in “personal journalism,” the Sun is keyed to the wishes of average people in an average small town. Local stories are written about, and more important, for what Sun writers believe to be the backbone of America, the family of Mr. and Mrs. Doe.

How Mr. and Mrs. Doe of Chenango County get their newspaper every day is a story in itself. Actually every day in The Norwich Publishing company is a story in itself. Yesterday is dead, and tomorrow does not yet count. Every action in a newspaper hinges on the present. There is much truth in the saying that nothing is as dead as yesterday’s newspaper.

With this in mind, newspapermen, including linotype operators, pressmen, makeup men, and “ad alleymen” work with day’s deadline always in mind. Just what are the steps taken before the news in The Norwich Sun reaches its readers?

To begin with, the Sun is a member of The Associated Press, famous news service which daily sends Norwich’s newspaper its quota of world-wide news. The Albany bureau of the AP services the Sun with complete national and international coverage. From the AP and others services, features which are now considered indispensable in many of the nation’s newspapers.

For local coverage the Sun has reporters covering beats daily. Each day a reporter has a certain amount of “stops” he must make. Gathering the news he returns to the office, and begins to play the role of spectator. A reporter takes the place of all those who cannot attend some event, or some incident. He merely tells the public what transpired: hence, he is considered a spectator who objectively tells the story.

Briefly, after the reporter’s copy has undergone all necessary steps in the editorial room, it is taken to the composing room where four linotype operators and two make-up men set type, form pages, and perform other functions which eventually result in the pages which readers see.

After pages have been set they are sent to the pressroom and prepared for a day’s run on the company’s large flat-bed press. Briefly then these are the steps taken in bringing the news to Chenangoites. Of course there are many other steps incidental to printing that must be taken before the news is ready for public consumption, so to speak.

The Newspapers of Norwich

Wednesday, October 10th, 2012
Kevin Doonan

The following is an essay written 1929 by a Norwich high school student about the history of Chenango County newspapers from 1803 to 1929.

NEWSPAPERS OF NORWICH

Over thirty-eight papers have been read and circulated by the people of Norwich since 1804. Not all these papers were published in Norwich, although they were obtained for reading matter.

The first newspaper published in Chenango County was the Western Oracle, which was published at Sherburne Four Corners in 1803. It was a single octavo sheet, at first of bluish paper, and contained very few advertisements and little local news. This latter feature was one which peculiarly characterized all our earlier newspaper publications and one which is greatly regretted at the present day. A newspaper of the early day, as rich in local details as are our present newspapers, would be invaluable to the present generation. This paper was discontinued in 1806. The Oracle was followed in the same year by the Olive Branch, which was established on the West Hill in the town of Sherburne by Phinney & Fairchild. Two years later Mr. Fairchild became the sole proprietor. The name was now changed to the Volunteer. In 1816 John F. Hubbard purchased the press and commenced the publication of the Norwich Journal, which he sold a year later to LaFayette Neal and J. H. Sinclair, who merged its publication at Norwich under the name of the Chenango Union. Mr. Neal then sold his interest to Harvey Hubbard, who also purchased Mr. Sinclair’s interest and continued its publication until his death September 14, 1862. The next year John F. Hubbard, Jr. became the sole proprietor and continued such for the next five years, when he sold to G. H. Manning. In 1890 it passed into the hands of Manning and Moore. Five years later (1895) it passed into the hands of Mr. E. S. Moore, who is still the proprietor and editor. The circulation of this paper is at present somewhat over eight hundred. It is the oldest paper of Norwich and Chenango County.

The Anti-Masonic Telegraph was commenced in Norwich in November, 1829, by E. P. Pellett. In a few years he became associated with Mr. B. T. Cook. The paper was published only on Wednesday mornings. The office was one door north of the Chenango Bank. If the paper was delivered at the subscriber’s home, a charge of two dollars per annum had to be paid. All letters and other forms of communication had to be sent by mail to one of the editors.

The Chenango Telegraph, upon the death of E. P. Pellett, passed into the hands of his brother, Nelson Pellett. Upon the death of Nelson Pellett, it was conducted for the estate by E. Max Neal and F. B. Fisher. It was later purchased by Rice and Martin, by whom it was then published.

The Chenango Semi-Weekly Telegraph was published in Norwich every Wednesday and Saturday morning. The office was in the Telegraph Block, which was at one time near the present Eagle Hotel. The terms were two dollars per annum, and if a person delayed in paying he was no longer allowed the paper.

The Norwich Sun was established in 1891. The city editor was George H. Smith, who came to Norwich from Oneonta. The managing editor was Reed Campbell. After the death of Reed Campbell on April 4, 1899, the newspaper came into the hands of the Norwich Publishing Company. The company also took over the publication of the Chenango Telegraph at that time, and William H. Clark became the managing editor, with Fred L. Ames as the city editor. Mr. William L. Clark continues as managing editor to the present day. Mr. P. L. Clark, one of our prominent business men, is at present the editor in charge. He had held this position since 1910. The Norwich Sun is the only daily newspaper in Chenango County and in Chenango Valley between Binghamton and Utica which has the Associated Press Service. Preceding the contract with the Associated Press the Norwich Sun was supplied by the United Press Service, and preceding that by the American Press Service. Service is available twenty-our hours of the day and comes by telephone and Western Union. The display advertisement rates are thirty cents per inch. The National rates are forty-two cents an inch or at the rate of three cents per agate line. The circulation has been above three thousand mark for the past ten years. There are more copies of the Norwich Sun distributed every night in the city than there are residences. The Chenango Telegraph, our present Norwich Sun, will be one hundred years old in January 19, 1929.

The Booster was established in May, 1926, by the Buell Printing Company. This paper is entirely an advertising medium and all money is derived from the printing of advertisements only. It is circulated to the people within a radius of twenty miles of Norwich. It contains from eight to ten pages and is tabloid in form. The advertising rate is twenty cents an inch. It is published only on every Thursday of each week.

Elizabeth Curley

Early employees of The Sun …

Monday, October 8th, 2012
Kevin Doonan

In celebration of National Newspaper Week, everyday between now and Friday I will be posting an old newspaper articles, letter, or essay written about The Evening Sun and other Chenango County publications, many which no longer exist.

The following letter was sent to the editor of The Evening Sun (then The Norwich Sun) in 1941, and describes for its readers a first person account of the inception of the The Evening Sun (then The Morning Sun) in 1891.

Some Early EmployeEs Of The Morning Sun Are Named By Halbert

March 18, 1941

Mr. P. L. Clark

Editor Norwich Sun,

Dear Sir:

Having read your story of the fiftieth anniversary of The Sun in last night’s issue, I thought perhaps I could add a little light about those early days.

I was serving the third year as apprentice printer in the office of The Telegraph, when Reed Campbell started The Sun. One reason, perhaps, that there was no statement of ownership and editorial responsibility might have been that Reed was a traveling salesman, selling cloaks for a New York firm, he had only a four months’ season with an eight months’ vacation, and it was during one of these vacations that The Sun was started and before the paper was fairly on its feet it was time for Reed to start on his annual trip, but he postponed the matter so long that another man was sent out to cover his territory. He had tried to keep the secret of his venture from employers, but was unsuccessful.

Reed Campbell was his own editor, but on the staff was quite an assortment of young men, of whom I can recall only a few. There was Paul Abell, the father, I think, of Sinclair Abell, Richard Frink, a printer who also worked at the case some of the time, John A. (Sparks) Randall, Harry Follett, a lawyer lately deceased, and sundry others.

In the mechanical department the foreman was George Willard, a New Berlin man, who later became the local editor and still later publisher of the New Berlin Gazette. The ‘devil’ was George Carley. who finally became the local editor and later owned and published one of the Cooperstown papers and was also postmaster of Cooperstown. There was a young lady, (Lucy – - – last name forgotten) sorted cases during the day and set some of the editorials. A varied assortment of printers worked there on time or another, Frank Wilbur, called “Cap I” because of his protruding eyeballs, Arthur F. Arrow, Lynn B. Marvin, later on the old Binghamton Republican and then to New York. They had no pressman and Reed made a deal with me whereby I arose at two-thirty in the morning and went in and put the paper to press. This arrangement continued for two-thirty in the morning and went in and put the paper to press. This arrangement continued for about two months when I believe Carley took over the duties of pressman in addition to his other work. After completing my apprenticeship I held down a case there for about a year, after which Reed and I could not seem to agree, and my connection with the paper was severed.

Sincerely yours,

A. E. HALBERT.

And 12,000 came to see Denison hung high …

Thursday, September 27th, 2012
Kevin Doonan

Here’s a story uncovered during my research into the Chenango County Historian’s files … one that didn’t quite make it into today’s special section on the 175th anniversary of the courthouse, but is interesting nonetheless.

In 1833, the first of two men hung in Chenango County perished after a long drop and a short stop. The tale of George Denison’s untimely demise is an odd one. It is believed that during the week, Denison boarded in New Berlin where he worked. He has been described in early newspapers as a jovial drunk who was everyone’s friend when tippling.

On 30 September, 1822, Denison was making the long trip home along the New Berlin-Columbus road. As he traveled Denison stopped various inns along his route, forking over his weeks earnings to procure copious quantities of alcoholic beverages. As Denison proceeded towards home, so to did the grasp of drunkeness progressively clench its steely claws upon his mind, befuddling his senses and impeding judgment.

Everything seemed to be going well for Denison, he no doubt was having the time of his life and wished only to elongate the one man festival. But the good time came to an abrupt halt when Denison stumbled into the inn of Hamlin Gregory. The coldhearted innkeeper cut short Denison’s revelry by refusing the hapless man even a single drop of amber spirit. Enraged beyond reason, the rapscallion departed from the inn, swearing retribution for these most grievous of affronts.

Mournful over being so unjustly slighted, Denison returned home. At this point he no doubt helped himself to some more drink, but what he unequivocally did was load a gun with shot and powder.

Utilizing the most sound channels of logic conceivable, Denison had determined someone ought to teach Hamlin Gregory a lesson on denying a parched man the means to quench his thirst. Intend upon “peppering” Hamlin’s leg, Denison came upon old Gregory lounging in the shadows of a woodshed doorway. Denison noted that Hamlin wore his iconic large slouched hat pulled low upon his brow, while he smoked his token corn pipe. Swaying ever so slightly, Denison squinted one bloodshot eye, took aim at one of the many images he saw of Hamlin’s leg, and fired. A satisfying thump resounded when the bullet met the flesh of the man seated before Denison. As the barrel of his gun cooled, the drunk scoured a nearby field for a nice quiet spot to have a lay down and proceeded to pass out. That morning the sun arose to find Hamlin inexplicably unbesmirched.

The day before, on September 30th, Hamlin’s son, Reuben Gregory, was suffering from an agonizing toothache. No remedy could alleviate Reuben’s discomfort and it was suggested to him that he try smoking tobacco. Unfortunately though, Reuben was not a habitual smoker and did not own a smoking device. And so in search of a remedy for his toothache, Reuben sought out his father’s corn pipe. He found it along with his father’s slouched hat, which he put on. He then settled into a chair in the shadows of a woodshed doorway adjacent to his father’s inn and proceeded to puff on his old man’s pipe.

Reuben most likely did not see his death coming, nor is it likely that he had time to register the shot that killed him. Although Denison protested until his dying breath that his intention had been merely to wound the man he thought to be Hamlin, the bullet he fired had traveled straight through young Reuben’s heart, piercing the wood behind him.

When Denison was awoken to face the consequences of his actions, he expressed both shock and anguish for the deed he had committed whilst deep in the thralls of fermented spirits. Denison went to the gallows a remorseful man, leaving behind a wife and two children.

– KJD

The average voter …

Friday, September 21st, 2012
Kevin Doonan

Winston Churchill said it best when he said, “The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation with the average voter.”

I am most definitely a proponent of democracy, in fact I feel that it is, unequivocally, among the greatest concepts every devised by mankind. No, my qualm lays with any aversion to questioning even the greatest of systems. Yes, the modern concept of democracy is functioning form of government we have yet come up with, but this does not mean that it can not be improved because there are flaws? What can be said about giving uneducated voters a vote? It is unethical to deny anyone the vote, yet it is scary that individuals unwilling to accept facts have a measure of power of all.

And what about voters who are in the minority? By its very nature democracy oppresses voters in the minority. Working together, we can create a better and brighter future, but that can only be accomplished if we all agree not to be content with what has proven acceptable in the past and instead strive to better ourselves and the world we live in.

All you need is a dollar and a dream …

Thursday, September 6th, 2012
Kevin Doonan
For a short week, it’s turned out to be a jam-packed one. The Judicial candidate forum is tonight and Colorscape unfolds this weekend all to the backdrop of the Republican and Democratic National Conventions. No doubt these will be the things on a lot of Chenango county residents’ minds.
Incidentally there is other big news that has flown under the radar. Kraft Macaroni and Cheese will be giving away one billion dollars to any one who can land a kite on the moon. No, not really but that’s about as easy to accomplish as it is to win the New York State Lottery, yet people still flock to their local convenience stores to procure tickets. Somehow it’s ironic that the state would run a large scale gambling system under the premise that it is a better way to part citizens from their paychecks than a direct increase in taxation. Yet while people are taught that gambling is acceptable as long as the state gains from it, cuffs are slapped on the wrists of anyone who does it outside of a reservation for more than a dollar.
Gambling is one of most profitable ventures for people other than for gamblers themselves. For instance every time I get into a car, I am gambling with my life and I pay for it – the recipients being my insurance company. Gambling is attractive for a number of reasons. It gives hope to the desperate when nothing else does. It is forbidden by the government, which probably only adds to its allure. I myself have only been to a casino once and have never bought a lottery ticket. I guess the reason is that I have never been able to persuade myself that I will win. Or maybe it’s just that I cant take the sour taste of disappointment when the odds don’t add up in my favor. Enough of that and one could develop a complex.
Follow me on Twitter … @evesunkevin

For a short week, it’s turned out to be a jam-packed one. The Judicial candidate forum is tonight and Colorscape unfolds this weekend all to the backdrop of the Republican and Democratic National Conventions. No doubt these will be the things on a lot of Chenango county residents’ minds.

Incidentally there is other big news that has flown under the radar. Kraft Macaroni and Cheese will be giving away one billion dollars to any one who can land a kite on the moon. No, not really but that’s about as easy to accomplish as it is to win the New York State Lottery, yet people still flock to their local convenience stores to procure tickets. Somehow it’s ironic that the state would run a large scale gambling system under the premise that it is a better way to part citizens from their paychecks than a direct increase in taxation. Yet while people are taught that gambling is acceptable as long as the state gains from it, cuffs are slapped on the wrists of anyone who does it outside of a reservation for more than a dollar.

Gambling is one of most profitable ventures for people other than for gamblers themselves. For instance every time I get into a car, I am gambling with my life and I pay for it – the recipients being my insurance company. Gambling is attractive for a number of reasons. It gives hope to the desperate when nothing else does. It is forbidden by the government, which probably only adds to its allure. I myself have only been to a casino once and have never bought a lottery ticket. I guess the reason is that I have never been able to persuade myself that I will win. Or maybe it’s just that I cant take the sour taste of disappointment when the odds don’t add up in my favor. Enough of that and one could develop a complex.

Follow me on Twitter … @evesunkevin

New reporter on the beat …

Friday, August 31st, 2012
Kevin Doonan

Hello readers I’m Kevin Doonan, The Evening Sun’s brand new reporter. A recent graduate of Binghamton University and resident of Smyrna, I have been writing for the paper for a little over a week. I will be covering the regions of Sherburne, Greene, Oxford, Coventry, Guilford, Bainbridge and Afton – so if anyone hears of anything going on in those areas, get a hold of me!
My first two weeks working at the paper have been filled with fun new things. In just a short period of time, I have been exposed to parts of the county I never knew existed. For instance, I can count the number of times I have passed Greene Central School and wondered what the large, squat, faceless white building was doing leering over the grade school’s campus. This week, that curiosity was quenched when I discovered that it was the building housing the Raymond Corporation, the largest employer in Chenango County.
With that realization, a feeling of foolish satisfaction washed over me. Foolish for not having known something that seems like such common knowledge and satisfied because every gnawing, nagging whisper of curiosity I can squash represents a miniscule squelchy step taken towards tranquility. Of course with every question in life answered, arises a dozen more quandaries, each one pushing tranquility ever further away.
E-mail me … kdoonan@evesun.com
Call me … 607 337 3074
Tweet me … @evesunkevin