Jeff's Reporter Blog

Editor’s Notebook: Finale. cialis online

Thursday, March 14th, 2013
Jeff Genung
• Even though I broke the news on Facebook last week, Wednesday’s front page missive from our publisher, Dick Snyder, made it official – I am leaving The Evening Sun on Friday, March 15. I’ve accepted a position in communications with Chobani and while I’ll spend the next week gearing up for that amazing opportunity, I’ll spend the next 24 hours or so in a more melancholy state, leaving behind almost 23 years worth of memories with Chenango County’s Hometown Daily. It will not be an easy day.
• Most of what I have to say will be in my column tomorrow, but I thought I’d use my last Editor’s Notebook blog to answer a question a couple people have asked me this week: How many reporters have you worked with over the years? I don’t really know the exact number, so I’m going to type them out here from memory (a risky exercise in itself) and see how many I come up with … how many names do you recognize?
• First, we should qualify “reporters” as my employed staff writers. Also under my employ, though generally not counted as reporters, were photographer Frank Speziale and three sports editors – Tom Rowe, Mike King and Pat Newell.
• On to the general reporter staff, most likely not in chronological order: JoAnn Smith, Karen Bergamo, Dan Bartlett, Mary Lawrence, Heidi Rauch-Webb, Karen Wilhelm, Kathy O’Hara, Katie Fern, Dave Warren, Stacy Beaumont, Mike Hamilton, Jill Fahy, Sean Brigham, Melissa Hendricks, Mike Platta, Dan Matlack, Stacy Moreno, Barbara Hollings, Christian Vischi, Vince Keenan, Nicole Martinez, Jude Seymour, Melissa deCordova, Josh Campbell, Jeff Morse, Andrea Snyder, Mike McGuire, Todd Campbell, Jill Kraft, Jessica Lewis, Tyler Murphy, Melissa Stagnaro, Brian Golden, Julian Kappel, Shawn Magrath and my last hire, Kevin Doonan … number 36. Not exactly the 50 I’d guessed, but that’s not including the two guys who quit after three days, or the multiple stints pulled by Mike, Stacey, Christian and Tyler. Or the countless number of interns, some of whom lasted a week but several who lasted all summer. Oh, and our many faithful correspondents over the years – some we knew quite well (Tom Schwan, Jerry Weaver and Bob McNitt, all dearly departed), and others who were passing emails in the night. In any case, phew. It was a privilege to work with each and every one of you (except maybe those I fired … but even a few of them, too).
• And that’s it, folks, as far as my Editor’s Notebook blog goes. Check out the breadth of my sentimentality in tomorrow’s Page 4 column. Soon this blog will fade into the ether, and a new writer will eventually take my place. It’s been a pleasure entertaining you online. Godspeed.

• Even though I broke the news on Facebook last week, Wednesday’s front page missive from our publisher, Dick Snyder, made it official – I am leaving The Evening Sun on Friday, March 15. I’ve accepted a position in communications with Chobani and while I’ll spend the next week gearing up for that amazing opportunity, I’ll spend the next 24 hours or so in a more melancholy state, leaving behind almost 23 years worth of memories with Chenango County’s Hometown Daily. It will not be an easy day.

• Most of what I have to say will be in my column tomorrow, but I thought I’d use my last Editor’s Notebook blog to answer a question a couple people have asked me this week: How many reporters have you worked with over the years? I don’t really know the exact number, so I’m going to type them out here from memory (a risky exercise in itself) and see how many I come up with … how many names do you recognize?

• First, we should qualify “reporters” as my employed staff writers. Also under my employ, though generally not counted as reporters, were photographer Frank Speziale and three sports editors – Tom Rowe, Mike King and Pat Newell.

• On to the general reporter staff, most likely not in chronological order: JoAnn Smith, Karen Bergamo, Dan Bartlett, Mary Lawrence, Heidi Rauch-Webb, Karen Wilhelm, Kathy O’Hara, Katie Fern, Dave Warren, Stacy Beaumont, Mike Hamilton, Jill Fahy, Sean Brigham, Melissa Hendricks, Mike Platta, Dan Matlack, Stacy Moreno, Barbara Hollings, Christian Vischi, Vince Keenan, Nicole Martinez, Jude Seymour, Melissa deCordova, Josh Campbell, Jeff Morse, Andrea Snyder, Mike McGuire, Todd Campbell, Jill Kraft, Jessica Lewis, Tyler Murphy, Melissa Stagnaro, Brian Golden, Julian Kappel, Shawn Magrath and my last hire, Kevin Doonan … number 36. Not exactly the 50 I’d guessed, but that’s not including the two guys who quit after three days, or the multiple stints pulled by Mike, Stacey, Christian and Tyler. Or the countless number of interns, some of whom lasted a week but several who lasted all summer. Oh, and our many faithful correspondents over the years – some we knew quite well (Tom Schwan, Jerry Weaver and Bob McNitt, all dearly departed), and others who were passing emails in the night. In any case, phew. It was a privilege to work with each and every one of you (except maybe those I fired … but even a few of them, too).

• And that’s it, folks, as far as my Editor’s Notebook blog goes. Check out the breadth of my sentimentality in tomorrow’s Page 4 column. Soon this blog will fade into the ether, and a new writer will eventually take my place. It’s been a pleasure entertaining you online. Godspeed.

Editor’s Notebook: 2/18/13

Monday, February 18th, 2013
Jeff Genung
• Cold enough for ya? Considering my car wouldn’t start this morning, and it’s a Monday, and it’s Presidents’ Day, and we seem to be the only ones in the free world working today … yes, yes it’s cold enough.
• Note to self: Great to have a garage. Better to have a garage with an actual door. Put that on the To Do list.
• While my trusty newsroom staff knows full well that I loathe the phrase “raising awareness” (we’re aware already, we’re aware!), that’s pretty much the only way to describe Saturday’s event held for Jennifer Ramsaran, the New Berlin wife and mother who’s been missing since December. It wasn’t a search (someone tried to organize a civilian search, but later called it off) and it certainly wasn’t a memorial (God willing, she’s not dead), so Saturday’s “Shining Hope” event at St. Bart’s in Norwich was just that – an awareness raiser. That’s really all you can do at this point – keep circulating her picture, keep the word out there. Someone, somewhere, knows what happened to this poor woman. For the sake of her family, and the community, let’s all pray for a resolution soon.
• Published a picture on Facebook today of the weekend crowd supporting Norwich in its failed basketball title bid against Maine-Endwell. Is it just me, or does anyone else find those giant cut-out heads disconcerting?
• So it’s a national “holiday,” my car won’t start, I’m working on getting a cold, and they killed Matthew off on “Downton Abbey” last night. Sounds like I should call it a day.

• Cold enough for ya? Considering my car wouldn’t start this morning, and it’s a Monday, and it’s Presidents’ Day, and we seem to be the only ones in the free world working today … yes, yes it’s cold enough.

• Note to self: Great to have a garage. Better to have a garage with an actual door. Put that on the To Do list.

• While my trusty newsroom staff knows full well that I loathe the phrase “raising awareness” (we’re aware already, we’re aware!), that’s pretty much the only way to describe Saturday’s event held for Jennifer Ramsaran, the New Berlin wife and mother who’s been missing since December. It wasn’t a search (someone tried to organize a civilian search, but later called it off) and it certainly wasn’t a memorial (God willing, she’s not dead), so Saturday’s “Shining Hope” event at St. Bart’s in Norwich was just that – an awareness raiser. That’s really all you can do at this point – keep circulating her picture, keep the word out there. Someone, somewhere, knows what happened to this poor woman. For the sake of her family, and the community, let’s all pray for a resolution soon.

• Published a picture on Facebook today of the weekend crowd supporting Norwich in its failed basketball title bid against Maine-Endwell. Is it just me, or does anyone else find those giant cut-out heads disconcerting?

• So it’s a national “holiday,” my car won’t start, I’m working on getting a cold, and they killed Matthew off on “Downton Abbey” last night. Sounds like I should call it a day.

Editor’s Notebook: 2/4/13

Monday, February 4th, 2013
Jeff Genung
• Been a while, I know. Back into the thick of things, what with the Progress finale and Melissa deCordova’s retirement and all. Time to get back to the “regular” newspaper grind.
• So I forgot a “Continued on …” again. Haven’t done it for years and years, and now I’ve done it twice in the last six months! Grrr. I’m going to blame the aforementioned Progress stress, again. I have to get as much mileage out of that excuse as I can. Seriously, my apologies for those who were frustrated that Brian Golden’s county court roundup did not, indeed, continue on Page 3 as promised. Mistakes happen, but still … I made that story free on evesun.com and it will run in its entirety in Tuesday’s print edition. And I’ll never do it again, I swear!
• Had a wonderful Progress celebration/retirement luncheon at Park Place on Friday, in which we said farewell for the departing Melissa deCordova, who has left The Evening Sun after nine years reporting on county government, and more recently, natural gas development. Joining the current ES crew were alumni Tyler Murphy and Melissa Stagnaro – always good to see old friends, even on a bittersweet occasion. We’ll miss you terribly, MDC!
• Before Friday’s lunch (which happily turned into Friday dinner, I might add), those of us in the Lackawanna Ave. office of The Evening Sun took part in another yearly tradition – hauling out a year’s worth of garbage. Yes, we have a regular cleaning guy, but still stuff tends to pile up. My philosophy? If you haven’t touched it in the last year, get rid of it. Happy to say that you can now see the shelves in the closet, and the ghosts of Macintoshes Past have finally fled the storage room. It’s always nice to start off the new year (and ours always starts post-Progress) with a clean slate.
• Heard there was a football game last night. Lights went out, Beyonce was bootylicious. Didn’t watch it. All I needed to know was on ‘30 Seconds’ all day long …

• Been a while, I know. Back into the thick of things, what with the Progress finale and Melissa deCordova’s retirement and all. Time to get back to the “regular” newspaper grind.

• So I forgot a “Continued on …” again. Haven’t done it for years and years, and now I’ve done it twice in the last six months! Grrr. I’m going to blame the aforementioned Progress stress, again. I have to get as much mileage out of that excuse as I can. Seriously, my apologies for those who were frustrated that Brian Golden’s county court roundup did not, indeed, continue on Page 3 as promised. Mistakes happen, but still … I made that story free on evesun.com and it will run in its entirety in Tuesday’s print edition. And I’ll never do it again, I swear!

• Had a wonderful Progress celebration/retirement luncheon at Park Place on Friday, in which we said farewell for the departing Melissa deCordova, who has left The Evening Sun after nine years reporting on county government, and more recently, natural gas development. Joining the current ES crew were alumni Tyler Murphy and Melissa Stagnaro – always good to see old friends, even on a bittersweet occasion. We’ll miss you terribly, MDC!

• Before Friday’s lunch (which happily turned into Friday dinner, I might add), those of us in the Lackawanna Ave. office of The Evening Sun took part in another yearly tradition – hauling out a year’s worth of garbage. Yes, we have a regular cleaning guy, but still stuff tends to pile up. My philosophy? If you haven’t touched it in the last year, get rid of it. Happy to say that you can now see the shelves in the closet, and the ghosts of Macintoshes Past have finally fled the storage room. It’s always nice to start off the new year (and ours always starts post-Progress) with a clean slate.

• Heard there was a football game last night. Lights went out, Beyonce was bootylicious. Didn’t watch it. All I needed to know was on ‘30 Seconds’ all day long …

Editor’s Notebook: 1/15/13

Tuesday, January 15th, 2013
Jeff Genung
• All day I’ve been thinking it’s the 14th. Here’s hoping I didn’t screw up the Comics page again.
• Steam is rising off the keyboards in The Evening Sun newsroom as the reporters inch toward the Friday editorial deadline for Progress Chenango 2013. Brad Carpenter and Jill O’Hara are out pounding the pavement drumming up advertising, too – be sure to check out this premier publication Jan. 28-Feb. 1 every day in The Evening Sun.
• Kevin’s story on the Oxford Memorial Library today brought back a lot of memories. That was my first job in high school back in the 80s … library clerk, I guess I was? I worked there through high school and on and off through college breaks as a jack of all trades and general know it all, I suppose. I have many fond memories of the hours I spent in that venerable old building (which was, literally, much smaller back in the day) both alone and working with the Oxford reading public … and my bosses Nan Hall and Claire Maholchic … and of course my own mother, Ann Genung, who tended the front desk for over two decades. Current librarian Nancy Wilcox, her staff and board of directors have done an amazing job in renovating and restoring the historic Fort Hill structure.
• We don’t do customer service issue stories. Someone called today with what I initially thought was just that … turns out it was indeed a larger issue, but still the message bears repeating: We don’t do customer service issue stories. If you think you got taken at Business X, or terrible service at Restaurant Y, or you think Corporation Z screwed up your bill … sorry, we’re not going to touch that. I know sometimes your first impulse is to alert the media, but we live in too small of a community to delve into stories which ultimately would serve one person, or be detrimental to a small local business (of which we are one). You can tell us about your bad experience there sure, but then we’d have to call that business to get their side of the story … and then, most likely, you’ve got a nasty case of he said/she said. No one is served by that, and it doesn’t make for good reading. Unless a business’ issues have widespread community impact (closings, openings, lawsuits, expansions, etc.), we’re not going to write that kind of story. As much as we can, we try to bolster local business, not tear it down. If you’re a justly disgruntled customer, call the Better Business Bureau, the police, a lawyer … or do it the old-fashioned way – tell everyone who will listen not to go there.
• For similar reasons, we don’t do neighbor vs. neighbor stories. But that’s another blog …

• All day I’ve been thinking it’s the 14th. Here’s hoping I didn’t screw up the Comics page again.

• Steam is rising off the keyboards in The Evening Sun newsroom as the reporters inch toward the Friday editorial deadline for Progress Chenango 2013. Brad Carpenter and Jill O’Hara are out pounding the pavement drumming up advertising, too – be sure to check out this premier publication Jan. 28-Feb. 1 every day in The Evening Sun.

• Kevin’s story on the Oxford Memorial Library today brought back a lot of memories. That was my first job in high school back in the 80s … library clerk, I guess I was? I worked there through high school and on and off through college breaks as a jack of all trades and general know it all, I suppose. I have many fond memories of the hours I spent in that venerable old building (which was, literally, much smaller back in the day) both alone and working with the Oxford reading public … and my bosses Nan Hall and Claire Maholchic … and of course my own mother, Ann Genung, who tended the front desk for over two decades. Current librarian Nancy Wilcox, her staff and board of directors have done an amazing job in renovating and restoring the historic Fort Hill structure.

• We don’t do customer service issue stories. Someone called today with what I initially thought was just that … turns out it was indeed a larger issue, but still the message bears repeating: We don’t do customer service issue stories. If you think you got taken at Business X, or terrible service at Restaurant Y, or you think Corporation Z screwed up your bill … sorry, we’re not going to touch that. I know sometimes your first impulse is to alert the media, but we live in too small of a community to delve into stories which ultimately would serve one person, or be detrimental to a small local business (of which we are one). You can tell us about your bad experience there sure, but then we’d have to call that business to get their side of the story … and then, most likely, you’ve got a nasty case of he said/she said. No one is served by that, and it doesn’t make for good reading. Unless a business’ issues have widespread community impact (closings, openings, lawsuits, expansions, etc.), we’re not going to write that kind of story. As much as we can, we try to bolster local business, not tear it down. If you’re a justly disgruntled customer, call the Better Business Bureau, the police, a lawyer … or do it the old-fashioned way – tell everyone who will listen not to go there.

• For similar reasons, we don’t do neighbor vs. neighbor stories. But that’s another blog …

Editor’s Notebook: 1/14/13

Monday, January 14th, 2013
Jeff Genung

• Crazy juxtaposition today of Frank’s photo of the ice-measurers for the Chenango Lake Perch Derby and Brian’s story of the ice-break rescue at Hunt’s Pond Sunday night. There’s a safe way to do it, and a not safe way to do it … ice fishing, that is. Me, I’d rather go to Red Lobster and save everyone the trouble.

• Looks like Jodie Foster came out at the Golden Globes last night, kinda. In other breaking news …

• As I mentioned in last Friday’s blog, Chobani will be served during the presidential inauguration festivities in Washington, D.C. My favorite ‘30 Seconds’ comment today asked why they call it Greek yogurt when it’s made in the U.S. of A. – insinuating, of course, that it’s un-American otherwise. Yeah, that’s the spirit … not.

Editor’s Notebook: 1/11/13

Friday, January 11th, 2013
Jeff Genung
• Wrote entirely too much about the Comics page in today’s column. But hey, people were asking … Truth is, I don’t even read it. The comics, not my column. I read Dear Abby, and my horoscope, but the rest of ‘em I just plug in every day. Not my cup of tea, but judging by reaction when I change it or screw it up, it sure is yours!
• Thank you to Ken Smith of Cornell Cooperative Extension for submitting today’s special report on milk production. As we deal with a slightly smaller staff going forward, we’ll rely more and more on experts like Mr. Smith to contribute pieces like this. It’s a good read … and I made it free on evesun.com, so check it out.
• Got a late-afternoon press release from Sen. Chuck Schumer’s office  – guess what they’ll be serving at President Barack Obama’s inauguration? Our very own Chobani Greek yogurt, of course! “Serving Chobani Greek Yogurt before the Inaugural Ceremonies shines a spotlight on one of New York’s biggest, and most delicious, dairy companies,” said Schumer. “President Obama, Vice President Biden, members of Congress, the Supreme Court, the Cabinet and all VIPs attending the Inauguration will get a chance to try some of the best Greek yogurt in the country. I’m pleased to be able to showcase a fantastic New York company.”
“We’re incredibly proud of our New York roots and honored to be a part of the Inaugural Ceremonies as we look towards America’s future,” said Hamdi Ulukaya, Chobani Founder, President and CEO. “The Chobani story demonstrates that the American spirit is alive and well and proves that if you truly believe in something and work hard, anything is possible.”
• The reporters are hunkering down for their last weekend before the Progress deadline next Friday … which means it’s my chance to skedaddle. My hell … err, fun … begins next Saturday, when I start assembling the 10-section behemoth. Look for it to hit your local newsstands on Monday, Jan. 28!

• Wrote entirely too much about the Comics page in today’s column. But hey, people were asking … Truth is, I don’t even read it. The comics, not my column. I read Dear Abby, and my horoscope, but the rest of ‘em I just plug in every day. Not my cup of tea, but judging by reaction when I change it or screw it up, it sure is yours!

• Thank you to Ken Smith of Cornell Cooperative Extension for submitting today’s special report on milk production. As we deal with a slightly smaller staff going forward, we’ll rely more and more on experts like Mr. Smith to contribute pieces like this. It’s a good read … and I made it free on evesun.com, so check it out.

• Got a late-afternoon press release from Sen. Chuck Schumer’s office  – guess what they’ll be serving at President Barack Obama’s inauguration? Our very own Chobani Greek yogurt, of course! “Serving Chobani Greek Yogurt before the Inaugural Ceremonies shines a spotlight on one of New York’s biggest, and most delicious, dairy companies,” said Schumer. “President Obama, Vice President Biden, members of Congress, the Supreme Court, the Cabinet and all VIPs attending the Inauguration will get a chance to try some of the best Greek yogurt in the country. I’m pleased to be able to showcase a fantastic New York company.”

“We’re incredibly proud of our New York roots and honored to be a part of the Inaugural Ceremonies as we look towards America’s future,” said Hamdi Ulukaya, Chobani Founder, President and CEO. “The Chobani story demonstrates that the American spirit is alive and well and proves that if you truly believe in something and work hard, anything is possible.”

• The reporters are hunkering down for their last weekend before the Progress deadline next Friday … which means it’s my chance to skedaddle. My hell … err, fun … begins next Saturday, when I start assembling the 10-section behemoth. Look for it to hit your local newsstands on Monday, Jan. 28!

Editor’s Notebook: 1/9/13

Wednesday, January 9th, 2013
Jeff Genung
• Thanks to the helpful ‘30 Seconds’ caller who told me that in some cases, the car alarm button on a key fob is used as a kind of “call for help” in an emergency situation, and that I should have checked to see if someone needed assistance rather than bitching about it my blog. Point taken. I did, after a few frustrating minutes, look out my window (although I confess it was more out of frustration than concern) to see what I could see – and saw someone sheepishly walking toward the vehicle in question to shut it up. See? We all learn something on evesun.com don’t we?
• The Sheriff’s Department updated their ‘Most Wanted’ list again. I think Brian keeps writing that story hoping he’ll appear on it.
• Although a more fitting tribute will be forthcoming, since it was announced at our company-wide birthday cake meeting this morning, I’ll inform you quickly here that Melissa deCordova, Evening Sun reporter extraordinaire, will be leaving us at the end of January. Although her go-around with the paper this time was nine years, her employment at the ES actually predates mine by a tad – she was here (well, there – back when we were on Hale Street) on my very first day in 1990. I’ll be spilling some more ink on that later undoubtedly (and probably shedding a few tears), but suffice it to say now that we wish her the very best in her early retirement.
• Kevin did his ‘Punching the Clock’ performing energy audits with Blueox today. He, Brian and Shawn have done a great job resurrecting this popular series. Do you have an interesting job you’d like to have one of my Evening Sun boys perform for a day? Email me at jgenung@evesun.com. No job is too dirty or humiliating for them, trust me :)

• Thanks to the helpful ‘30 Seconds’ caller who told me that in some cases, the car alarm button on a key fob is used as a kind of “call for help” in an emergency situation, and that I should have checked to see if someone needed assistance rather than bitching about it my blog. Point taken. I did, after a few frustrating minutes, look out my window (although I confess it was more out of frustration than concern) to see what I could see – and saw someone sheepishly walking toward the vehicle in question to shut it up. See? We all learn something on evesun.com don’t we?

• The Sheriff’s Department updated their ‘Most Wanted’ list again. I think Brian keeps writing that story hoping he’ll appear on it.

• Although a more fitting tribute will be forthcoming, since it was announced at our company-wide birthday cake meeting this morning, I’ll inform you quickly here that Melissa deCordova, Evening Sun reporter extraordinaire, will be leaving us at the end of January. Although her go-around with the paper this time was nine years, her employment at the ES actually predates mine by a tad – she was here (well, there – back when we were on Hale Street) on my very first day in 1990. I’ll be spilling some more ink on that later undoubtedly (and probably shedding a few tears), but suffice it to say now that we wish her the very best in her early retirement.

• Kevin did his ‘Punching the Clock’ performing energy audits with Blueox today. He, Brian and Shawn have done a great job resurrecting this popular series. Do you have an interesting job you’d like to have one of my Evening Sun boys perform for a day? Email me at jgenung@evesun.com. No job is too dirty or humiliating for them, trust me :)

Editor’s Notebook: 1/8/13

Tuesday, January 8th, 2013
Jeff Genung
• It’s about 5:20 p.m. and there’s a car alarm that’s been going off somewhere near our little Lackawanna Ave. hovel now for a good 15 minutes. If it doesn’t stop soon, I am not responsible for my actions.
• Kevin Doonan wrote a nice piece today on Oxford town and village historian Vicky House, who took up the mantle from longtime (long, longtime) historian extraordinaire Charlotte Stafford after she passed away in 2010 at the ripe old age of 91. Being an Oxford boy, I can tell you that Miss Stafford was a village icon in my formative years, a veritable font of knowledge on all things Oxford. In my high school gig working at the village library, I was entertained often by Miss Stafford, who spent hour upon hour out at the back table, poring over old issues of The Review-Times. I never knew exactly what she was looking for, but her discoveries always seemed, to me, serendipitous. She’d often share with me a little tidbit of history she’d come across, and could always relate it to my family or people I’d know. The woman had a mind like a steel trap. Her encyclopedic knowledge of Oxford history was a marvel in the days long before Google, or computers for that matter. I’ve had the pleasure of meeting Vicky several times, and dare say she’s well on her way to carrying on Charlotte’s legacy in a true and lasting way.
• You can tell I haven’t eaten dinner yet when I get all “misty water-colored memories” about my job at the library.
• Or maybe it’s the Chinese Water Torture of that *&#%@ car alarm. Seriously.
• Swelby’s got an official launch date – Feb. 6! For those of you who still don’t know quite what Swelby is (in a nutshell: Downtown, Online), click on this link and check it out. Color me impressed by my colleagues next door in coming up with The Next Big Thing.

• It’s about 5:20 p.m. and there’s a car alarm that’s been going off somewhere near our little Lackawanna Ave. hovel now for a good 15 minutes. If it doesn’t stop soon, I am not responsible for my actions.

• Kevin Doonan wrote a nice piece today on Oxford town and village historian Vicky House, who took up the mantle from longtime (long, longtime) historian extraordinaire Charlotte Stafford after she passed away in 2010 at the ripe old age of 91. Being an Oxford boy, I can tell you that Miss Stafford was a village icon in my formative years, a veritable font of knowledge on all things Oxford. In my high school gig working at the village library, I was entertained often by Miss Stafford, who spent hour upon hour out at the back table, poring over old issues of The Review-Times. I never knew exactly what she was looking for, but her discoveries always seemed, to me, serendipitous. She’d often share with me a little tidbit of history she’d come across, and could always relate it to my family or people I’d know. The woman had a mind like a steel trap. Her encyclopedic knowledge of Oxford history was a marvel in the days long before Google, or computers for that matter. I’ve had the pleasure of meeting Vicky several times, and dare say she’s well on her way to carrying on Charlotte’s legacy in a true and lasting way.

• You can tell I haven’t eaten dinner yet when I get all “misty water-colored memories” about my job at the library.

• Or maybe it’s the Chinese Water Torture of that *&#%@ car alarm. Seriously.

• Swelby’s got an official launch date – Feb. 6! For those of you who still don’t know quite what Swelby is (in a nutshell: Downtown, Online), click on this link and check it out. Color me impressed by my colleagues next door in coming up with The Next Big Thing.

Editor’s Notebook: 1/7/13

Monday, January 7th, 2013
Jeff Genung

• Probably dated myself severely with the Columbo reference in today’s editorial, didn’t I? Not even going to guess what the “Murder, She Wrote” reference may have done.

• Nice to see that the Sheriff’s Department is updating its “Most Wanted” list. Hopefully spreading the word will help land some of these miscreants back behind bars. That said, the whole Sheriff’s Facebook page leaves me a bit puzzled. I can see the rationale behind posting their recent arrests on that page, but allowing people to comment on them freely has gotten out of hand on more than one occasion. There was one in particular last week that garnered more than 40 comments overnight – and not even about the arrest itself, but a profanity-laden flame war among the commenters. Guys, Facebook allows you to filter that %&^#.

• Then again, I publish ‘30 Seconds,’ so I should talk. At least the language is clean.

• Stayed up way past my bedtime last night watching the two-hour premiere of “Downton Abbey” season three on PBS. (I like adding ‘PBS’ like I do ‘NPR,’ to make me sound like a smartie). Loved, loved, loved Shirley Maclaine’s turn as Martha Levinson, the aging socialite who turned Matthew and granddaughter Mary’s nuptials upside down. Never thought anyone could steal a scene from Dame Maggie Smith until last night!

Editor’s Notebook: 1/4/13

Friday, January 4th, 2013
Jeff Genung
• In case you missed my column today, therein I vowed to write more often. So here I am. On a Friday afternoon, no less. Those who have worked here before, or who have ever met me, know what a tremendous sacrifice this is.
• My first editorial topic for Monday will be pretty easy: Amateur sleuthing. With all the intrigue surrounding Jennifer Ramsaran’s disappearance, suddenly everyone in Chenango’s a detective. Angela Lansbury, you’re not. Leave it to the pros.
• Hope you caught the front page feature on the new North End Deli in Norwich in yesterday’s edition. A naysayer on Facebook (there’s one in every crowd) wished them luck since, according to him, no restaurants north of the city stand a chance of survival – except, as he pointed out, Pizza Hut, Dusty’s, Arby’s and Bill’s. There’s logic for ya.
• Very glad we avoided the dreaded Dairy Cliff as well as the Fiscal Cliff. I need my 2 percent. No way I’m drinking milk that comes from a bean.

• In case you missed my column today, therein I vowed to write more often. So here I am. On a Friday afternoon, no less. Those who have worked here before, or who have ever met me, know what a tremendous sacrifice this is.

• My first editorial topic for Monday will be pretty easy: Amateur sleuthing. With all the intrigue surrounding Jennifer Ramsaran’s disappearance, suddenly everyone in Chenango’s a detective. Angela Lansbury, you’re not. Leave it to the pros.

• Hope you caught the front page feature on the new North End Deli in Norwich in yesterday’s edition. A naysayer on Facebook (there’s one in every crowd) wished them luck since, according to him, no restaurants north of the city stand a chance of survival – except, as he pointed out, Pizza Hut, Dusty’s, Arby’s and Bill’s. There’s logic for ya.

• Very glad we avoided the dreaded Dairy Cliff as well as the Fiscal Cliff. I need my 2 percent. No way I’m drinking milk that comes from a bean.